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Jan 3
TOUR
Juan Carmona Tour 2700 F St NW, Washington, DC 20566
Jan
4
6
Performance
POLLOCK Abrons Arts Center - Underground Theater 466 Grand St, New York, NY 10002
Jan 3
TOUR
Juan Carmona Tour 423 Central Ave NW, Albuquerque, NM 87102

Anne Portugal

Anne Portugal is a French poet who lives and works in Paris. She was born in Angers (Maine-et-Loire) and attended Paris 8 University. Her recent work Définitif bob, translated by Jennifer Moxley as Absolute bob (Burning Deck Press), has been the subject of considerable critical and popular interest. Burning Deck has also published Portugal’s chapbook, Quisite Moment, translated by Rosmarie Waldrop (2008).

Portugal’s first collection, La licence qu'on appelle autrement parrhésie, was published in the collective Cahier de poésie 3 (Gallimard, 1980) in France. Since then, Anne Portugal has published with P.O.L. Editions: Les commodités d'une banquette (1985), De quoi faire un mur (1987), Le plus simple appareil (1992) - which Norma Cole has translated into English as Nude (Kelsey St. Press, 2001) - Dans la reproduction en deux parties égales des plantes et des animaux (1999) and her most recent volume : La formule Flirt (2010) translated as Flirt Formula by Jean-Jacques Pourcel (La Presse Poetry,2013).

Her work is influenced by, and often references, Jacques Roubaud as well as contemporary sources such as instruction booklets and video games.

More about her books, here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ABOUT ABSOLUTE BOB :

Absolute Bob (Burning Deck Press)
Bob, a brave little guy (joker, operator, sheer energy?) bops like a video-game character through the many ways a poem inhabits sense or nonsense, speeds or slows, slides into forms or undoes them. Bob occupies his virtual field of action in perpetual motion, beats down doors, explores corridors, removes walls, strikes sparks from repetition, sets fire to ”the same old,” pulls the levers of creation.

The book’s 24 chapters remind us of a film’s 24 images per second and - just as bob to French ears suggests bobine - the reel that unrolls them. We experience 24 hours in the day of a man who must exhaust himself in command performances that gradually asphyxiate even the fabrication of verse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AUTHORS ON TOUR