The Arab of the Future

Written by Riad Sattouf; Sam Taylor (translator)
The Arab of the Future, the #1 French best-seller, tells the unforgettable story of Riad Sattouf's childhood, spent in the shadows of 3 dictators--Muammar Gaddafi, Hafez al-Assad, and his father. READ MORE

Rochester Knockings: A Novel of the Fox Sisters

Written by Hubert Haddad; Jennifer Grotz (translator)
The Fox Sisters grew up outside of Rochester, NY, in a house with a reputation for being haunted, due to a series of strange “knockings” that plagued its inhabitants. Fed up with the sounds, the youngest of the sisters (aged twelve) challenged their ghost and ended up communicating with a spirit who had been murdered in the house and buried in the cellar. READ MORE

Foucault Against Himself

Written by François Caillat (dir.); David Homel (translator)
In his private life, as well as in his work and political attitudes, Michel Foucault often stood in contradiction to himself, especially when his expansive ideas collided with the institutions in which he worked. In Francois Caillat's provocative collection of essays and interviews, leading contemporary critics and philosophers reframe Foucault's legacy in an effort to build new ways of thinking about his struggle against society's mechanisms of domination, demonstrating how conflict within the self lies at the heart of Foucault's life and work. READ MORE

Suite Française: Storm in June

Written by Emmanuel Moynot; David Homel (translator)
This dramatic and stirring graphic novel, translated from the French and faithful to the spirit of Nemirovsky's story, focuses on Book 1, entitled "Storm in June", in which a disparate group of Paris citizens flees the city ahead of the advancing German troops. However, their orderly plans to escape are eclipsed by the chaos spreading across the country, and their sense of civility and well-being is replaced by a raw desire to survive. READ MORE

Louis I, King of the Sheep

Written by Olivier Tallec
Louis’s increasingly elaborate fantasy of what comes with being a supreme ruler: the pleasures, the responsibilities, the capriciousness. “What’s good for me is good for my people,” thinks King Louis in this clever fable about the randomness and absurdity of power, but also its abuses, and the hidden dangers in a society built on conformity. READ MORE

The Man in a Hurry

Written by Paul Morand; Euan Cameron (translator)
Pierre Niox is an antiques dealer who suffers from a curious affliction: he insists on doing everything quickly, which puts him at odds with other human beings.And yet he is equally sure that, if he slows down, even for a moment, he will die or, worse, miss a new opportunity. READ MORE

The Owner's Manual to Terrible Parenting

Written by Guy Delisle; Helge Dascher (translator)
The Owner's Manual is the perfect antidote to frustrating car rides filled with "Are we there yet?" and epic battles over homework. Delisle's effortless pacing and witty punch lines reign supreme here, making each vignette zip along to its conclusion. READ MORE

Francis Picabia Catalogue Raisonné

Written by William A. Camfield
This publication is the first of four volumes in the catalogue raisonné of Francis Picabia (1879–1953), one of the most significant, challenging artists of the 20th century. The works in Volume I range from Picabia’s early pieces as an Impressionist in the 1890s to his Cubist and abstract paintings of 1912–14, which constitute landmarks in the history of modern art. READ MORE

The Bureau of Misplaced Dads

Written by Eric Veillé; Pauline Martin (illustrator)
This funny and heartwarming picture book covers a subject every child can relate to — the fear of getting separated from a parent. However, in Éric Veillé's original story, the roles are reversed and the child is the one searching, while the dads are all “lost” and waiting to be picked up. The illustrations by Pauline Martin highlight quirky details of the fathers, bringing a light touch to the subject. READ MORE

Citizenship

Written by Etienne Balibar; Tomas Scott-Railton (translator)
The question of what it means to be a citizen has, from the dawn of Western politics, been anything but clear and straightforward; and modernity has shown it to be even more enigmatic and contested. So are there too many antinomies within citizenship? Balibar does not shy away from these antimonies, but he knows that to renounce citizenship would be to abandon the chance to create new modes of collective autonomy, in short, to democratize democracy. READ MORE

Savage Seasons

Written by Kettly Mars; Jeanine Herman (translator)
Kettly Mars’s "Savage Seasons" describes a pivotal and painful period in Haitian history by weaving together two stories: the personal story of Nirvah and her family and the universal story of Duvalier’s dictatorial regime and its abuses. READ MORE

The Festival of Insignificance

Written by Milan Kundera; Linda Asher (translator)
From the internationally acclaimed, bestselling author of The Unbearable Lightness of Being, an unexpected and enchanting novel—the culmination of his life's work. READ MORE

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