The Pen and the Brush: How Passion for Art Shaped Nineteenth-Century French Novels

Written by Anka Muhlstein | Other Press | January 31, 2017
A scintillating glimpse into the lives of acclaimed writers and artists and their inspiring, often surprising convergences, from the author of "Monsieur Proust’s Library". READ MORE

Radicalization: Why Some People Choose the Path of Violence

Written by Farhad Khosrokhavar | Translated by Jane Marie Todd
In the wake of the Paris, San Bernadino, and Brussels terrorist attacks, fears over “homegrown terrorism” have surfaced to a degree not seen since September 11, 2001—especially following the news that all of the perpetrators in Paris were European citizens. A sought-after commentator in France and a widely respected international scholar of radical Islam, Farhad Khosrokhavar has spent years studying the path toward radicalization, focusing particularly on the key role of prisons as incubators of a particular brand of outrage that has yielded so many attacks over the past decade. READ MORE

Montaigne: A Life

Written by Philippe Desan | Translated by Steven Rendall and Lisa Neal
One of the most important writers and thinkers of the Renaissance, Michel de Montaigne helped invent a literary genre that seemed more modern than anything that had come before. But did he do it, as he suggests in his Essays, by retreating to his chateau, turning his back on the world, and stoically detaching himself from his violent times? In this definitive biography, Philippe Desan, one of the world’s leading authorities on Montaigne, overturns this longstanding myth by showing that Montaigne was constantly concerned with realizing his political ambitions—and that the literary and philosophical character of the Essays largely depends on them. READ MORE

Jean Renoir: A Biography

Written by Pascal Mérigeau | Foreword by Martin Scorsese | Translated by Bruce Benderson
Originally published in France in 2012, Pascal Mérigeau’s definitive biography of legendary film director Jean Renoir is a landmark work—a study of one of the most fascinating and creative artistic figures of the twentieth century. READ MORE

The Ecology of Attention

Written by Yves Citton | translated by Barnaby Norman

Information overload, the shallows, weapons of mass distraction, the googlization of minds: countless commentators condemn the flood of images and information that dooms us to a pathological attention deficit.

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Barthes: A Biography

Written by Tiphaine Samoyault | Translated by Andrew Brown | Foreworded by Jonathan Culler

Roland Barthes (1915-1980) was a central figure in the thought of his time, but he was also something of an outsider. His father died in the First World War, he enjoyed his mother’s unfailing love, he spent long years in the sanatorium, and he was aware of his homosexuality from an early age: all this soon gave him a sense of his own difference. He experienced the great events of contemporary history from a distance. However, his life was caught up in the violent, intense sweep of the twentieth century, a century that he helped to make intelligible.

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Earthlight: Poems

Written by André Breton | Translated by Bill Zavatsky and Zack Rogow

Best known in the United States as the mastermind of the Surrealist movement and as the author of Nadja, André Breton has always enjoyed in Europe the reputation of being a brilliant poet as well. Bill Zavatsky's and Zack Rogow's award winning translation of Breton's Earthlight (Clair de terre) introduces the English-language audience to the delights―and complexities―of Breton's amazing poetry.

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Can You Keep a Straight Face?

Written by Elisa Géhin and Bernard Duisit

Can you keep a straight face? Straight eyebrows? Straight lips? A straight… nose? These pages are packed with interactive tabs that allow children to pull funny faces with impunity.

Elisa Géhin is a children’s book illustrator. Bernard Duisit is a French paper engineer.

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2084: The End of the World

Written by Boualem Sansal | Translated by Alison Anderson

A tribute to George Orwell's 1984 and a cry of protest against totalitarianism of all kinds, Sansal's 2084 tells the story of a near future in which religious extremists have established an oppressive caliphate where autonomous thought is forbidden.

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Lost Profiles Memoirs of Cubism, Dada, and Surrealism

Written by Philippe Soupault | Translated by Alan Bernheimer | Foreword by Mark Polizzotti | Afterword by Ron Padgett

Poet Alan Bernheimer provides a long overdue English translation of this French literary classic—Lost Profiles is a retrospective of a crucial period in modernism, written by co-founder of the Surrealist Movement. Opening with a reminiscence of the international Dada movement in the late 1910s and its transformation into the beginnings of surrealism, Lost Profiles then proceeds to usher its readers into encounters with a variety of literary lions.

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Marxist Thought and the City

Written by Henri Lefebvre | Translated by Robert Bononno | Foreword by Stuart Elden
For the first time in English, Lefebvre’s essential work on how Marx and Engels conceptualized the development of the city. READ MORE

Like Bits of Wind

Written by Pierre Chappuis | Translated by John Taylor
Selected Poetry and Poetic Prose, 1974-2014 READ MORE

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