Anna and Froga: Out and About

Written by Anouk Ricard | Translated by Helge Dascher | Drawn & Quarterly | June 21, 2016

In the fifth volume of Anouk Ricard's hilarious modern kids’ classic, Anna, Froga, Ron, Christopher, and Bubu continue their non-adventures with bickering, needling, cajoling, and honest friendship. No white lie goes unexposed, no small embarrassment goes unrevealed, no secret is kept.

For Christmas, the gang decides to forego shopping malls and make their own gifts for one another; Bubu goes on a retreat to shed a few extra pounds and get in touch with his zen side; a vampire with exceptional Scrabble skills moves in next door; and the five friends embark on an unforgettable trip to Paris, where they stay in an itsy-bitsy apartment. Rarely is friendship treated so realistically and delightfully as it is in the comics of Anouk Ricard.

Anouk Ricard is an author, artist, and stop motion animator. She was born in the south of France. She began the Anna and Froga series after moving to Strasbourg in 2004. Initially published in Capsule Comique magazine, the collections of strips were reprinted by Sarbacane to widespread acclaim.

“[Anna & Froga is] charming without being precious, hilarious without being overly goofy or random.”—School Library Journal

More information is available on the publisher's website.

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