Anna and Froga: Wanna Gumball?

Written by Anouk Ricard
Anna and Froga:
Wanna Gumball?
by Anouk Ricard
2012

The misadventures of five charming troublemakers.  Anouk Ricard’s Anna and Froga features the adventures of a little girl named Anna and her gang of animal friends. Anna’s best friend is the titular Froga, and they often hang out with Bubu the dog (an aspiring artist), Christopher the gourmand earthworm, and Ron (a practical joker of a cat). With a sly humor, Ricard spins yarns that will delight and entertain the whole family.

Whether the conflict is driven by eating too many French fries, bossing around Johnny the Tuna, or trying to beat a difficult video game, you know that Anna, Froga, Bubu, Ron, and Christopher will come out all right in the end, which makes the layers of confusion they pile on one another all the funnier. Ricard’s characters are sweet without ever veering into preciousness, as they constantly find opportunities for a laugh at one another’s expense.

Ricard works in a fanciful and childlike style, with vibrant colors and simple story lines. The illustrations in Anna and Froga are inviting and the stories well told, employing short, snappy dialogue. Without sacrificing quality, intelligence, or humor, Angoulême Festival–nominated author Ricard is able to write from childhood effectively and charmingly.

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