Blue White Red

Written by Alain Mabanckou | Translated by Alison Dundy
Blue White Red
by Alain Mabanckou
Translated by Alison Dundy
(Indiana University Press, 2013)
This tale of wild adventure reveals the dashed hopes of Africans living between worlds. When Moki returns to his village from France wearing designer clothes and affecting all the manners of a Frenchman, Massala-Massala, who lives the life of a humble peanut farmer after giving up his studies, begins to dream of following in Moki’s footsteps. Together, the two take wing for Paris, where Massala-Massala finds himself a part of an underworld of out-of-work undocumented immigrants. After a botched attempt to sell metro passes purchased with a stolen checkbook, he winds up in jail and is deported. Blue White Red is a novel of postcolonial Africa where young people born into poverty dream of making it big in the cities of their former colonial masters. Alain Mabanckou's searing commentary on the lives of Africans in France is cut with the parody of African villagers who boast of a son in the country of Digol.
 
Reviews:
 
". . . the African Beckett." —The Economist

"Mabanckou’s provocative novel probes the many facets of the 'migration adventure,' including the shame that accompanies migrants home when their foreign sojourn ends in failure." —Booklist

"Alain Mabanckou counts as one of the most successful voices of young African literature in the French language." —Ulrich Schreiber, Internationales literaturfestival berlin

"Alain Mabanckou can be defined as the 'clear guide' of a new generation of Congolese writers." —Infopagecongo
 
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