California Dreamin'

Written by Pénélope Bagieu | Translated by Nanette Cooper-McGuinness
Macmillan | March 7, 2017

Before she became the legendary Mama Cass—one quarter of the mega-huge folk group The Mamas and the Papas—Cass Eliot was a girl from Baltimore trying to make it in the big city. After losing parts to stars like Barbra Streisand on the Broadway circuit, Cass found her place in the music world with an unlikely group of cohorts.

The Mamas and the Papas released five studio albums in their three years of existence. It was at once one of the most productive (and profitable) three years any band has ever had, and also one of the most bizarre and dysfunctional groups of people to ever come together to make music. Through it all, Cass struggled to keep sight of her dreams—and her very identity.

Pénélope Bagieu was born in Paris in 1982, to Corsican and Basque parents. She is a bestselling graphic novel author and her editorial illustrations have appeared all over the French media. She blogs, drums in a rock band, and watches lots of nature shows. Exquisite Corpse was her first graphic novel to be published in the United States.

March 10-13, 2017 Event -- Meet Pénélope Bagieu as she reads from her new graphic novel California Dreamin': Cass Elliot Before the Mamas & the Papas.

Publisher's website

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