Children are naughty

Written by Vincent Cuvellier & Aurélie Guillerey
Children are Naughty
Vincent Cuvellier & Aurélie Guillerey
Flying Eye Books, May 13, 2014

Children are naughty and parents are nice.

Some children bite and don’t share their toys and there are some who fight and make lots of noise. Let’s remember that parents were young once too! But were they as nice back then?

A tongue in cheek story about right and wrong, giving kids the opportunity to learn through laughter.

Vincent Cuvellier was born in Brittany in 1969, and published his first novel at the age of 17. He wrote about 50 books for children which received many prestigious prices and translated in no less then 15 languages.

Aurélie Guillerey is an illustrator for children's books. She works with a graphic tablet to draw, and design, for newspapers, publications for children and theatre companies.

Comments are moderated and generally will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive.
Sign in or register to post comments.

More new titles

new titles

The Flirt Formula

The poems go two by two across facing pages, where they press against each other, connect, and go forth in a tremulous manifesto. The result is a syntactical vertigo poised above nothingness. The halves meet only in an instant, suggesting that the crux of poetry is the art of not quite touching.
new titles

Waterloo and Trafalgar

In his first wordless picture book, Olivier Tallec shows the pointlessness of war through his smart, comic, emotionally astute illustrations. Tallec portrays two characters, separated only by narrow walls, who spy on each other through the seasons.
new titles

A History of the Grandparents I Never Had

A History of the Grandparents I Never Had cannot bring Matès and Idesa--overcome by the tragedies of the twentieth century: Stalinism, the mounting dangers in Europe during the 1930s, the Second World War, and the destruction of European Jews--back to life, but Ivan Jablonka succeeds in bringing his grandparents, as he soberly puts it, to light. The result is a gripping story, a profound reflection, and an absolutely extraordinary history.