Dictionary of Non-Philosophy

Written by François Laruelle | Translated by Taylor Adkins | May 22, 2013
Dictionary of Non-Philosophy, Univocal Publishing, May 2013

In Dictionary of Non-Philosophy, the French thinker François Laruelle does something that is unprecedented for philosophers: he provides an enormous dictionary with a theoretical introduction, carefully crafting his thoughts to explain the numerous terms and neologisms that he deems necessary for the project of non-philosophy. With a collective of thinkers also interested in the project, Laruelle has taken up the difficult task of carefully crafting an essential guide for entering into his non-standard, non-philosophical terrain. And for Laruelle, even the idea of a dictionary and what a dictionary is, becomes material for his non-philosophical inquiries. As his opening note begins, “Thus on the surface and within the philosophical folds of the dictionary, identity and its effect upon meaning are what is at stake.”

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