The Dream Maker

Written by Jean-Christophe Rufin, translated by Alison Anderson | November 15, 2013
The Dream Maker, Jean-Christophe Rufin, translated by Alison Anderson, Europa Editions, November 2013

Synopsis

Based on the true story of Jacques Coeur, The Dream Maker recounts the life and times of a Steve Jobs of the Middle Ages. Born to a modest fur trader, Coeur rose to become the King of France’s visionary First Banker who, with his tours of the Far East, his criticism of the Crusades, and his efforts to develop trade, contributed to bringing France out of darkness toward the Renaissance and modernity. Coeur was, at one time, the wealthiest man in France, but at the height of his success, disgrace and imprisonment at the hands of his enemies threatened. His ill-considered infatuation with Agnès Sorel, King Charles VII’s favorite mistress, and her mysterious and premature death, precipitated Coeur’s fall from grace.

In Rufin’s delicious prose this remarkable true story becomes a gripping tale of adventure, a novel of ideas, and a moving love story.


Jean-Christophe Rufin is one of the founders of Doctors Without Borders and a former Ambassador of France in Senegal. He has written numerous bestsellers, including The Abyssinian, for which he won the Goncourt Prize for a debut novel in 1997. He also won the Goncourt Prize in 2001 for Brazil Red.

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