The Eleven

Written by Pierre Michon | Translated by Jody Gladding and Elizabeth Deshays | February 2013
The Eleven
(Archipelago Books, Feb. 2013)

Corentin, a young man of humble origins, rises up in Parisian society, becoming a famous painter who is called upon to decorate the homes of Louis XIV’s mistresses. Yet his masterpiece is “The Eleven,” a revolutionary “Mona Lisa," a representation of the eleven members of the Committee of Public Safety (including Robespierre and Saint-Just) during the Reign of Terror.

Reviews:

"Its feeling for art, its psychological acuity, its inclination for the grand statement, and its appeal to the lofty -- are multiplied throughout The Eleven to glorious ends. I cannot recommend the book highly enough."—Christopher Byrd, B&N Review
 
"This book. . . It will bring you to your knees."—Le Nouvel Observateur
 
"An admirable book, genius, completely dazzling and full of dread, dark and brilliant, as if radiating with a black light." —Telerama

"The painting 'The Eleven'. . . Michon describes it with such precision, with such force, that you start to think it exists." —Liberation

"Michon's prose tends to slow down in order to oblige you to hear its rhythms and also to see and touch and smell what is happening beneath it." —Harper's

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