Grandpa How Do You Make a Kachina?

Written by Robin Pineau and illustration by Tom Chegaray | Toro Editions | March 2016

Kachinas are spirits.

They symbolize fire, rain, snakes, corn... all things and beings that give life to the world of Hopi Indians.

Kachinas are also dancers who embody these spirits. With their masks and their dances, they celebrate the world.

Kachinas, at last, are wooden dolls of many shapes. Dancers give them to children during festivals.

With Nampeyo and her Grandpa, discover how kachinas are made!

A colorful children's book about a delicate Native American tradition: the craft of Kachina. Available in French and English.

More information available on Toro Editions website

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