Infidels

Written by Abdellah Taïa | Translated by Alison L. Strayer | Seven Stories | May 3, 2016

Set in Salé, Morocco—the hometown Abdellah Taïa fled, but to which he returns again and again in his acclaimed fiction and films—Infidels follows the life of Jallal, the son of a prostitute witch doctor—"a woman who knew men, humanity, better than anyone. In Sex. Beyond Sex." As a ten-year-old sidekick to his mother, Jallal spits in the face of her enemies both real and imagined.

The cast of characters that rush into their lives are unforgettable for their dreams of love and belonging that unravel in turn. Built as a series of monologues that are emotionally relentless—a mix of confession, heart's murmuring, and shouting match—the book follows Jallal out of boyhood on the path to Jihad. It's a path that surprises even him.

ABDELLAH TAÏA was born in 1973 in the public library of Rabat, Morocco, where his family lived until he was two years old. Acclaimed as both a novelist and filmmaker, he writes in French and has published eight books, including Le jour de roi, which was awarded the prestigious French Prix de Flore in 2010. An adaptation of his novel L'Armée du salut was his first feature film, released in 2014, screened at major festivals around the world, and hailed by the New York Times as giving "the Arab world its first on-screen gay protagonist." He now lives in Paris.

"Taïa sharply etches the anguish and ecstasy of his characters. He is adept at depicting love for others as well as love for God, alongside humanity’s capacity for great cruelty. This is an undeniably powerful work." --Publisher's Weekly

More information is available on the publisher's website.

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