Masks

Written by Alphonse Allais; Norman Conquest (illustrator and translator)
Written by Alphonse Allais
Translated and illustrated by Norman Conquest
Introduction and notes by Doug Skinner

Black Scat Books, May 2015

Translated from the French, adapted and illustrated by Norman Conquest, this new volume also features a most Allaisian introduction & notes on the text by the great Doug Skinner.

Originally published in France under the title Un drame bien parisien (1890), this darkly humorous tale is quintessential Allaisa pataphysical text admired by the Surrealists (André Breton included it in his seminal Anthologie de l’humour noir). It was also celebrated by the French group Oulipo, and has been the subject of scholarly studies by the writer and semiotician Umberto Eco, Francis Corblin, and others.

This is the second edition of the text, that was first published in 2012 in a limited edition of 50 copies, as the first title of Black Scat Books' series Absurdist Texts & Documents.

About The Author

Alphonse Allais (1854-1905) was one of France's greatest humorists. His elegance, scientific curiosity, preoccupation with language and logic, wordplay and flashes of cruelty inspired Alfred Jarry, as well as succeeding generations of Surrealists, Pataphysicians, and Oulipians.

Click here to learn more about the book!

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