One Hundred Twenty-One Days

Written by Michèle Audin | Translated by Christiana Hills | Deep Vellum | April 12, 2016

The debut novel of mathematician, author, and Oulipo member Michèle Audin, One Hundred Twenty-One Days retraces the lives of French mathematicians over several generations during World Wars I and II.

The narrative oscillates stylistically from chapter to chapter, sometimes resembling a novel, at others a fable, historical research, or a diary, locking and unlocking codes, culminating in a captivating, original reading experience.

"B+: multifarious and calculated, to good effect." --The Complete Review

"Audin's smart, deeply empathetic text is enriched by recurrences, coincidences, and invocations of European poetry, including Dante's Inferno and Faust, since numbers alone cannot make sense of the war's aftermath." --Publisher's Weekly

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