Pachyderme

Written by Frederik Peeters, translated by Edward Gauvin | October 8, 2013
Pachyderme, written by Frederik Peeters, translated by Edward Gauvin, SelfMadeHero, October 2013

Our heroine, Carice, is visiting her husband – she has something important to tell him. He's a diplomat, who's lying in hospital following a car accident. Stuck in a traffic jam on her way to the hospital, she abandons her car and sets off on foot on a journey that turns into a surreal trip. Imagine a David Lynch film co-written by Chuck Palahniuk, Jean-Paul Sartre and Milan Kundera. This edition of Pachyderme has a foreword written by Moebius.


Frédérik Peeters is a contemporary Swiss graphist novelist. He received his bachelor of arts degree in visual communication from the Ecole Supérieure d'Arts Appliqués in Geneva in 1995. His autobiographical graphic novel Blue Pills received the Polish Jury Prize at the Angoulême International Comics Festival, where it was also nominated for Best Book. Blue Pills also won the Premios La Cárcel de Papel in Spain for Best Foreign Comic. This is his first work to be translated into English.

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