Prehistoric Times

Written by Written by Eric Chevillard | Translated by Alyson Waters
Prehistoric Times
by Eric Chevillard
translated by Alyson Waters
(Archipelago Books, 2012)

The narrator of Prehistoric Times might easily be taken for an inhabitant of Beckett’s world: a dreamer who in his savage and deductive folly tries to modify reality. The writing, with its burlesque variations, accelerations, and ruptures, takes us into a frightening and jubilant delirium, where the message is in the medium and digression gets straight to the point. In an entirely original voice, Eric Chevillard asks looming and luminous questions about who we are, the path we've been traveling, and where we might be going—or not.

Read an excerpt at The Brooklyn Rail!

"Prehistoric Times shows Chevillard at his best: off-kilter and linguistically dazzling, playful and acrobatic, quite mad but always entertaining--and all impossibly captured by Alyson Waters' fluid and masterful translation." —Brian Evenson, author of Windeye and Immobility

"Chevillard’s book is a very profound contemplation on the nature of posterity; it may even be inferred that throughout Prehistoric Times Chevillard writes with an awareness that his own artistic production will be dwarfed within the great span of time against which all human beings must live out their brief existence."  —Jordan Anderson, The Quarterly Conversation

More info: Archipelago Books

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