Radicalization: Why Some People Choose the Path of Violence

Written by Farhad Khosrokhavar | Translated by Jane Marie Todd
The New Press, 2017

In the wake of the Paris, San Bernadino, and Brussels terrorist attacks, fears over
“homegrown terrorism” have surfaced to a degree not seen since September 11,
2001—especially following the news that all of the perpetrators in Paris were European citizens. A sought-after commentator in France and a widely respected international scholar of radical Islam, Farhad Khosrokhavar has spent years studying the path toward radicalization, focusing particularly on the key role of prisons as incubators of a particular brand of outrage that has yielded so many attacks over the past decade.

Khosrokhavar argues that the root problem of radicalization is not a particular ideology but rather a set of steps that young men and women follow, steps he distills clearly in this deeply researched account. With insights that apply equally to far-right terrorists and Islamic radicals, Khosrokhavar argues that our security-focused solutions are pruning the branches rather than attacking the roots—which lie in the breakdown of social institutions, the expansion of prisons, and the rise of joblessness, creating disaffected communities with a sharp sense of grievance against the mainstream.

Farhad Khosrokhavar is the director of studies at the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences in Paris. An expert on contemporary Iran and Islam in France and the author of Radicalization (The New Press), he lives in Paris.
 
Comments are moderated and generally will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive.
Sign in or register to post comments.

More new titles

new titles

The Lights of Pointe-Noire

Alain Mabanckou left Congo in 1989, at the age of twenty-two, not to return until a quarter of a century later. When he finally came back to Pointe-Noire, a bustling port town on Congo’s southeastern coast, he found a country that had changed beyond recognition. A startlingly fresh perspective on the pain of exile, the ghosts of memory, and the paths we take back home.
new titles

Anna and Froga: Wanna Gumball?

Anouk Ricard’s Anna and Froga features the adventures of a little girl named Anna and her gang of animal friends. Anna’s best friend is the titular Froga, and they often hang out with Bubu the dog (an aspiring artist), Christopher the gourmand earthworm, and Ron (a practical joker of a cat). With a sly humor, Ricard spins yarns that will delight and entertain the whole family.
new titles

Fragments of Place

"Fragments of Place" asks all of us to be aware of the new pages of global history as they are written. Some of the stories in this collection are marked by war, social instability, totalitarianism, while others are peaceful and reassuring, but each emphasizes that great social movements call out for improvements to the common good, for true democracy without violence and with justice, for all citizens, including those yet to be born.
1/3
MORE IN books
event

Nature and the Dynamics of Contemporary Capitalism

MARCH 29, 2017 | 4pm-6pm
Wolff Conference Room, Albert and Vera List Academic Center
6 East 16th Street, New York, NY 10011, Room D1103
event

'Anachronisms' with Jacques Rancière

APRIL 14, 2017 | 9:30am - 4:00pm
Silver Center for Arts and Science Room 405
31 Washington Pl, New York, NY 10003
event

Abdellatif Laâbi’s Poems of Love and Struggle

April 21, 2017 | 7:00 p.m
NYU La Maison Francaise
16 Washington Mews
New York, NY 10003