State and Politics: Deleuze and Guattari on Marx

Written by Guillaume Sibertin-Blanc | Translated by Ames Hodges | Semiotext(e) | July 1, 2016

Often approached through their “micropolitics of desire,” the joint works of Deleuze and Guattari are rarely part of the discussion when classical and contemporary problems of political thought come under scrutiny. Yet if we follow the trajectory from Anti-Oedipus (1972) to A Thousand Plateaus (1980), it becomes clear that these problems were redeveloped during a period of historical transition marked by the end of the wars of decolonization, the transformation of global capitalism, and by recombinations of the forces of collective resistance that were as deep as they were uncertain.

In State and Politics, Guillaume Sibertin-Blanc measures how Deleuze and Guattari engage with the upheavals of their time by confronting their thought with its main interlocutor, Marxism. The reader discovers not only a new political theory but also the plurality of ways in which extreme violence—violence capable of destroying politics itself—can arise.

Guillaume Sibertin-Blanc is a French philosopher, an Associate Professor at the University of Toulouse II le Mirail, and a member of the International Center for the Study of Contemporary French Philosophy (ENS Ulm).

More information is available on the publisher's website.

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