Suite Francaise: Storm in June

Written by Emmanuel Moynot | Translated by David Homel
Arsenal Pulp - Sept 2017
Illustrated by Emmanuel Moynot
Translated by David Homel
Adapted from Irene Nemirovsky's novel

Suite Francaise, an extraordinary novel about village life in France just as it was plunged into chaos with the German invasion of 1940, was a publishing sensation ten years ago; Irene Nemirovsky completed the two-volume book, part of a planned larger series, in the early 1940s before she was arrested in France and eventually sent to Auschwitz, where she died. The notebook containing the novels was preserved by her daughters but not examined until 1998; it was finally published in France in 2004 and became a huge international bestseller, including in North America, where it has sold over 1 million copies.

A film version of Suite Francaise, starring Michelle Williams, Kristen Scott Thomas, and Margot Robbie, will be released in North America this fall.

Emmanuel Moynot is a graphic artist who has authored more than forty graphic novels published in France since the 1980s, including several featuring detective Nestor Burma, based on the crime novels of Leo Malet. He lives in Bordeaux, France.

Publisher's website


REVIEWS

"What captivated me about this adaptation was the real sense of turbulence, indeed absolute utter chaos, brought to people's lives overnight by the enforced Parisian exodus, and the very different reactions of the protagonists' responses." —Page 45

"Moynot succeeds with his expressive visual characterisation ... The sketchy style Moynot's chosen delivers an urgency suitable to the subject matter, and is surprisingly detailed." -The Slings and Arrows

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