Lost profiles: Mémoirs of Cubism, Dada, and Surrealism

Written by Philippe Soupault | City Lights | November 2016
Poet Alan Bernheimer provides a long overdue English translation of this French literary classic—"Lost Profiles" is a retrospective of a crucial period in modernism, written by co-founder of the surrealist movement. READ MORE

The Unknown Huntsman

Written by Jean-Michel Fortier | QC Fiction | November 1, 2016
There’s no shortage of intrigue in this offbeat debut novel by Jean-Michel Fortier: an unnamed village, a strange and anonymous narrator, an unsolved murder, a mysterious huntsman, and a wisdom tooth extraction gone terribly wrong. READ MORE

ELVIS

Written by Philippe Chanoinat and Fabrice Le Henanff | Translated by Joe Johnson

Stepping into Sun Studios in 1954 Elvis Aaron Presley recorded his first single "That's All Right". Little did he know he would soon revolutionize music and culture worldwide. This graphic novel biography starts with the story of "The King's" humble beginnings in Mississippi, detailing, every step of the way, his meteoric rise to the stratosphere of stardom.  It includes his service in the military, his extensive record as a Hollywood film star, his complicated family life, finally ending on the last days of the Hound Dog.

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Ariol Vol. 9 The Teeth of the Rabbit

Written by Emmanuel Guibert | Illustrated by Marc Boutavant
Bouncer, Ariol’s rabbit classmate, is the best one at sports (even if he wears a dental device). That’s just one typical detail you’ll discover in the latest all-new collection of twelve delicately delightful Ariol stories. READ MORE

Notes on the Cinematograph

Written by Robert Bresson | Translated by Jonathan Griffin | Introduction by J.M.G Le Clézio

The French film director Robert Bresson was one of the great artists of the twentieth century and among the most radical, original, and radiant stylists of any time. He worked with nonprofessional actors—models, as he called them—and deployed a starkly limited but hypnotic array of sounds and images to produce such classic works as A Man Escaped, Pickpocket, Diary of a Country Priest, and Lancelot of the Lake. From the beginning to the end of his career, Bresson dedicated himself to making movies in which nothing is superfluous and everything is always at stake.

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Bresson on Bresson: Interviews, 1943–1983

Written by Robert Bresson | Translated by Anna Moschovakis

Robert Bresson, the director of such cinematic master-pieces as Pickpocket, A Man Escaped, Mouchette, and L’Argent, was one of the most influential directors in the history of French film, as well as one of the most stubbornly individual: He insisted on the use of nonprofessional actors; he shunned the “advances” of Cinerama and Cinema-Scope (and the work of most of his predecessors and peers); and he minced no words about the damaging influence of capitalism and the studio system on the still-developing

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Such a Lovely Little War: Saigon, 1961-63

Written by Marcelino Truong | Translated by David Homel
This riveting, beautifully produced graphic memoir tells the story of the early years of the Vietnam War as seen through the eyes of a young boy named Marco, the son of a Vietnamese diplomat and his French wife. READ MORE

Suite For Barbara Loden

Written by Nathalie Léger | Dorothy Project | October 17, 2016
“I believe there is a miracle in Wanda,” wrote Marguerite Duras of the only film American actress Barbara Loden ever wrote and directed. “Usually, there is a distance between representation and text, subject and action. Here that distance is completely eradicated.” It is perhaps this “miracle”—the seeming collapse of fiction and fact—that has made Wanda (1970) a cult classic, and a fascination of artists from Isabelle Huppert to Rachel Kushner to Kate Zambreno. READ MORE

Men

Written by Marie Darrieussecq | The Text Publishing Co. | October 11, 2016
The French title of "Men" plays on a quote by Marguerite Duras: We have to love men a lot. A lot, a lot. Love them a lot in order to love them. Otherwise it’s impossible, we couldn’t bear them. READ MORE

Being a Skull: Place, Contact, Thought, Sculpturesee

Written by Georges Didi-Huberman | Translated by Drew S. Burk
A renowned art historian’s exploration of the work of the Italian artist Giuseppe Penone Through a careful study of artist Giuseppe Penone’s work regarding a sculptural and haptic process of contact with place, thought, and artistic practice, Georges Didi-Huberman examines various modes of thinking by way of being. Didi-Huberman sketches a sweeping view of how artists have worked with conceptions of the skull, that is, the mind, and ruminates on where thought is indeed located. READ MORE

Cockroaches

Written by Scholastique Mukasonga | Archipelago Books | October 4, 2016
In a tale that recounts her own experience fleeing the ethnic violence of Rwanda, Scholastique Mukasonga resurrects in heartbreaking detail the lives of her many family members who were killed. In her reflections, she captures not only the suffering brought about by her family’s displacement, but also the beauty present in small, quiet moments with her loved ones. READ MORE

Nature is a Battlefield: Towards a Political Ecology

Written by Razmig Keucheyan | Translated by David Broder
In the midst of the current ecological crisis, there is often lofty talk of the need for humanity to ‘overcome its divisions’ and work together to tackle the big challenges of our time. But as this new book by Razmig Keucheyan shows, the real picture is very different. READ MORE

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