Moving the Palace

Written by Charif Majdalani | Translated by Edward Gauvin

At the dawn of the 20th century, a young Lebanese explorer leaves the Levant for the wilds of Africa, encountering an eccentric English colonel in Sudan and enlisting in his service. In this lush chronicle of far-flung adventure, the military recruit crosses paths with a compatriot who has dismantled a sumptuous palace in Tripoli and is transporting it across the continent on a camel caravan.

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Hell’s Gate

Written by Laurent Gaudé | Translated by Emily Boyce

What if death was not the end? A thrilling story of love, loss, revenge and redemption in Naples and beyond.

When his son is killed by gangsters’ crossfire on his way to school, Neapolitan taxi driver Matteo is consumed by despair.

But just when he feels life has lost all meaning, he encounters a man who claims the living can find ways into the afterlife. And legend says that there’s an entrance to the underworld beneath Naples.

What if Matteo had a chance of bringing Pippo back from the dead? 

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Elle

Written by Philippe Djian | Translated by Michael Katims

Elle is a psychological thriller that recounts thirty days in the life of its heroine Michèle—powerfully portrayed by Isabelle Huppert in Paul Verhoeven’s award-winning film—where memory, sex, and death collide at every page. 

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The Japanese and the War

Written by Michael Lucken | Translated by Karen Grimwade

Memories of World War II exert a powerful influence over Japan's culture and society. In The Japanese and the War Expectation, Perception, and the Shaping of Memory, Michael Lucken details how World War II manifested in the literature, art, film, funerary practices, and education reform of the time.

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Words on Screen

Written by Michel Chion | Edited and translated by Claudia Gorbman

Michel Chion is well known in contemporary film studies for his innovative investigations into aspects of cinema that scholars have traditionally overlooked. Following his work on sound in film in Audio-Vision and Film, a Sound Art, Words on Screen is Chion's survey of everything the seventh art gives us to read on screen.

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Who You Think I Am

Written by Camille Laurens | Translated by Adriana Hunter

In a vertiginous play between fantasy and virtual reality, Camille Laurens relates the dangerous liaisons of a woman who refuses to give up on desire.

This is the story of Claire Millecam, a forty-eight-year-old teacher and divorcee who creates a fake social media profile to try to keep tabs on Joe, her occasional, elusive, and inconstant lover. Under the false identity of Claire Antunes, a young and beautiful twenty-four-year-old, she starts a correspondence with Chris—pseudonym KissChris—which soon turns into an Internet love affair.

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I Am Sarcey

Written by Alphonse Allais | translated by Doug Skinner

Francisque Sarcey was the most influential drama critic in 1890s Paris — and the most conservative. He famously dismissed Alfred Jarry‘s Ubu Roi as “a filthy fraud that deserves nothing but the silence of contempt.” The brilliant humorist Alphonse Allais transformed Sarcey into an Ubuesque piñata in a series of columns published under Sarcey’s name in the newspaper Le Chat Noir.

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The Hunt

Written by Margaux Othats

A young girl builds and rebuilds a sculpture out of rocks she finds strewn around as two hunters repeatedly shoot her creation to bits. As the girl perseveres, though, what she creates becomes a testament to the creative spirit and a condemnation of violence.

At its core, The Hunt by Margaux Othats is a meditation on the power of creativity and endurance over the forces of destruction. It's also a visual memo on girl power!

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Gauguin: The Other World

Written by Fabrizio Dori | Translated by Edward Gauvin

In 1891, Paul Gauguin (1848–1903) arrives on the French Polynesian island of Tahiti. In this lush paradise, he is liberated from the concerns of the city-dwelling European. He is free: to love, to sing, and to create. In Copenhagen, Gauguin’s wife enjoys no such freedom. She would rather forget her odious husband and his degenerate artwork. Instead, in a city resistant to the avant-garde, she is tasked with selling a collection of his extravagantly priced Tahitian paintings.

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The Table

Written by Francis Ponge | Translated, with an introduction, by Colombina Zamponi

Written over a series of early mornings from 1967 to 1973 in his seclusion at his country home, Mas des Vergers, The Table was Francis Ponge’s final text and offers a final chapter in his endless interrogation of the unassuming objects in his life: in this case, the table upon which he wrote. In his labored employment of words to destroy words and get at the presence lying beneath his elbow, Ponge charts out a space of silent consolation that lies beyond (and challenges) scientific objectivity and poetic transport.

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Jazz and Palm Wine

Written by Emmanuel Dongala | Translated and with a foreword by Dominic Thomas
Jazz, aliens, and witchcraft collide in this collection of short stories by renowned author Emmanuel Dongala. The influence of Kongo culture is tangible throughout, as customary beliefs clash with party conceptions of scientific and rational thought.
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Deep in the Forest

Written by Josef Antòn | Illustrated by Lucie Brunellière

Deep in the forest, early in the morning, the animals slowly wake—except the panda, who is sleeping in. The monkey stretches, the red ant hides, the black bear yawns, and the gazelle smiles. But where is the okapi? Can you find it?

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