The Gift

Written by Florence Noivile | Translated by Catherine Temerson | June 30, 2012
This moving fictional memoir begins as a woman heads home after a meeting regarding her inheritance. Rebeling against the legalese uttered by the attorney, her mind drifts back to her childhood and she sees her life with sudden clarity. On the train, she jots down a few notes, which prompt the poetic outpouring of memory and emotion that make up this delicate novel. READ MORE

Black France / France Noire: The History and Politics of Blackness

Written by Trica Danielle Keaton | June 26, 2012
In Black France / France Noire, scholars, activists, and novelists from France and the United States address the untenable paradox at the heart of French society. France's constitutional and legal discourses do not recognize race as a meaningful category. READ MORE

Lovers

Written by Daniel Arsand
At the court of Louis XV, Sébastien, a handsome fifteen year old boy versed in the medicinal arts, meets the nobleman Balthazar de Créon. De Créon, struck by the boy’s beauty and his talents as a healer, orders Sébastien to his manor a few months later so he can instruct him in the ways of the court, hoping thus to install him as Louis XV’s surgeon. READ MORE

Parisian Chic: A Style Guide

Written by Ines de la Fressange & Sophie Gachet
Her step-by-step do’s and don’ts are accompanied by fashion photography, and the book is personalized with her charming drawings. Inès also shares how to bring Parisian chic into your home, and how to insert your signature style into any space—even the office. The ultrachic volume is wrapped with a three-quarter-height removable jacket and features offset aquarelle paper and a ribbon page marker. READ MORE

Writings from the Sand: Vol. 1

Written by Isabelle Eberhardt | Edited by Marie-Odile Delacour and Jean-René Huleu | Translated by Melissa Marcus
Writings from the Sand, Volume 1, at once the document of a remarkable life and a literary treasure, appears here in English for the first time. Volume 1, including journals, diary entries, and observations of life in North Africa, offers a view of the culture and people of French Algeria rarely seen by outsiders—the peasants, prostitutes, mystics, criminals, and other marginalized members of a colonized society. READ MORE

Pictures into Words: Images in Contemporary French Fiction

Written by Ari J. Blatt | May 1, 2012
The explosive proliferation of pictures in advertising and pop culture, mass media, and cyberspace following World War II, along with the profusion of critical thinking that tries to make sense of it, has had wide-ranging implications for cultural production as such. Pictures into Words explores how this proliferation of graphic images has profoundly affected narrative writing in France, especially, as Ari J. Blatt argues, the structure, content, and symbolic logic of contemporary French fiction. READ MORE

Autoportrait

Written by Edouard Levé | Translated by Lorin Stein | March 15, 2012
In this brilliant and sobering self-portrait, Edouard Levé hides nothing from his readers, setting out his entire life, more or less at random, in a string of declarative sentences. Autoportrait is a physical, psychological, sexual, political, and philosophical triumph. READ MORE

Manhunts: A Philosophical History

Written by Grégoire Chamayou | Translated by Steven Rendall | July 2, 2012
Touching on issues of power, authority, and domination, Manhunts takes an in-depth look at the hunting of humans in the West, from ancient Sparta, through the Middle Ages, to the modern practices of chasing undocumented migrants. READ MORE

Farewell: The Greatest Spy Story of the Twentieth Century

Written by Sergueï Kostine and Eric Raynaud; Catherine Cauvin-Higgins (Translator)
A groundbreaking insight into Vladimir Ippolitovitch Vetrov's life, the man who helped hasten the fall of the Communist Soviet Regime. READ MORE

Decadence of Industrial Democracies

Written by Bernard Stiegler | Translated by Daniel Ross | September 2011
Bernard Stiegler is one of the most original philosophers writing today about new technologies and their implications for social, political and personal life. Drawing on sources ranging from Plato and Marx to Freud, Heidegger and Derrida, he develops a highly original account of technology as grammatology, as a technics of writing that constitutes our experience of time, memory and desire, even of life itself. Society and our place within it are shaped by technical reproduction which can both expand and restrict the horizons and possibilities of human agency and experience. READ MORE

The Conductor

Written by Laetitia Devernay | September 2011
Pairing two seemingly disparate elements—an orchestra conductor and a grove of trees—award-winning artist Laetitia Devernay herself orchestrates a visual magnum opus. READ MORE

Awakening Islam

Written by Stéphane Lacroix | Translated by George Holoch | August 2011
Amidst the roil of war and instability across the Middle East, the West is still searching for ways to understand the Islamic world. Stéphane Lacroix has now given us a penetrating look at the political dynamics of Saudi Arabia, one of the most opaque of Muslim countries and the place that gave birth to Osama bin Laden. READ MORE

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