Lacombe Lucien: The Screenplay

Written by Louis Malle and Patrick Modiano | Translated by Sabine Destrée | Other Press | May 31, 2016

Patrick Modiano and Louis Malle’s screenplay for the Oscar-nominated film tells a powerful story set in World War II France of a seventeen-year-old boy who allies himself with collaborators, only to fall in love with a Jewish girl.

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Villa Triste

Written by Patrick Modiano | Translated by John Cullen | Other Press | May 31, 2016
This novel by Nobel Prize–winning author Patrick Modiano is one of the most seductive and accessible in his oeuvre: the story of a man’s memories of fleeing responsibility, finding love, and searching for meaning in an uncertain world. READ MORE

France, Story of a Childhood

Written by Zahia Rahmani | Translated by Lara Vergnaud | Yale University Press | May 24, 2016
This moving tale of imprisonment and escape, persecution and loss, is narrated by the daughter of an alleged Harki, an Algerian soldier who fought for the French during the Algerian War for Independence. It was the fate of such men to be twice exiled, first in their homeland after the war, and later in France, where fleeing Harki families sought refuge but instead faced contempt, discrimination, and exclusion. READ MORE

Sweating Blood

Written by Léon Bloy | Translated by Erik Butler | Wakefield Press | May 24, 2016
First published in French in 1893, “Sweating Blood” describes the atrocities of war in thirty tales of horror and inhumanity from the pen of the “Pilgrim of the Absolute”, Léon Bloy. Writing with blood, sweat, tears, and moral outrage, Bloy drew from anecdotes, news reports, and his own experiences as a franc-tireur to compose a fragmented depiction of the 1870 Franco-Prussian war, told with equal measures of hatred and pathos, and alternating between cutting detail and muted anguish. READ MORE

Liberty or Death: The French Revolution

Written by Peter McPhee | Yale University Press | May 24, 2016
In this provocative new history, Peter McPhee draws on a lifetime's study of eighteenth-century France and Europe to create an entirely fresh account of the world's first great modern revolution-its origins, drama, complexity, and significance. Was the Revolution a major turning point in French-even world-history, or was it instead a protracted period of violent upheaval and warfare that wrecked millions of lives? McPhee evaluates the Revolution within a genuinely global context: Europe, the Atlantic region, and even farther. READ MORE

The Cathedral of Mist

Written by Paul Willems | Translated by Edward Gauvin | Wakefield Press | May 24, 2016
First published in French in 1983, The Cathedral of Mist is a collection of short stories from the last of the great Francophone Belgian fantasists, distilled tales of distant journeys, buried memories, and impossible architecture. READ MORE

Existential Monday: Philosophical Essays

Written by Benjamin Fondane | Edited, introduced, and translated by Bruce Baugh | New York Review Books | May 17, 2016
Existential Monday, the first selection of Benjamin Fondane's philosophical work to appear in English, includes four of his most thought-provoking and important texts, “Existential Monday and the Sunday of History,” “Preface for the Present Moment,” “Man Before History,” and “Boredom.” Here Fondane, until now little-known except to specialists, emerges as one of the enduring French philosophers of the twentieth century. READ MORE

Cinepoems and Others

Written by Benjamin Fondane | Edited and Introduction by Leonard Schwartz | New York Review Books | May 17, 2016

Benjamin Fondane was that rarest of poets: an experimental formalist with a powerful lyric poetic voice; a renegade surrealist who was also a highly original existential philosopher; a self-consciously Jewish poet of diaspora and loss, whose last manuscripts made it out of Drancy in 1944 just before his deportation to Auschwitz-Birkenau, where he was murdered, yet whose poetry speaks of an overflowing plenitude.

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What Is a People?

Written by Alain Badiou, Judith Butler, Jacques Rancière, Pierre Bourdieu, et al | Columbia University Press | May 2016
Outspoken intellectuals seek to reclaim "people" as an effective political concept by revisiting its uses and abuses over time. By engaging this topic linguistically, ethnically, culturally, and ontologically, these scholars help separate "people" from its fraught associations to pursue more vital formulations. READ MORE

A History of the Grandparents I Never Had

Written by Ivan Jablonka | Translated by Jane Kuntz | Stanford University Press | May 11, 2016
A History of the Grandparents I Never Had cannot bring Matès and Idesa--overcome by the tragedies of the twentieth century: Stalinism, the mounting dangers in Europe during the 1930s, the Second World War, and the destruction of European Jews--back to life, but Ivan Jablonka succeeds in bringing his grandparents, as he soberly puts it, to light. The result is a gripping story, a profound reflection, and an absolutely extraordinary history. READ MORE

Happy People Read and Drink Coffee

Written by Agnès Martin-Lugand | Sandra Smith | Weinstein Books | May 10, 2016
The international phenomenon described as Under the Tuscan Sun set in Ireland, about a recent widow who moves to the Irish coast and begins a tumultuous but ultimately healing relationship with her neighbor, a brooding Irish photographer. READ MORE

Constellation

Written by Adrien Bosc | Translated by Willard Wood | The Other Press | May 10, 2016
This best-selling debut novel from one of France’s most exciting young writers is based on the true story of the 1949 disappearance of Air France’s Lockheed Constellation and its famous passengers. READ MORE

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