Giving Life, Giving Death

Written by Lucien Scubla | Michigan State University Press | September 1, 2016
Although women alone have the ability to bring children into the world, modern Western thought tends to discount this female prerogative. In "Giving Life, Giving Death", Lucien Scubla argues that structural anthropology sees women as objects of exchange that facilitate alliance-building rather than as vectors of continuity between generations. READ MORE

Equinoxes

Written by Cyril Pedrosa | NBM Publishing | September 2016
Segmented into four tableaux for four seasons, unrelated people of all social backgrounds seeking equilibrium cross paths with other solitudes, weaving in and out of one another's lives- all captivated and tormented by the enigmatic meaning of life. Every season has its visual identity and its individual voice, culminating in summer and, possibly, an answer. READ MORE

Borderlands: Towards an Anthropology of the Cosmopolitan Condition

Written by Michel Agier | Polity Press | August 29, 2016
The images of migrants and refugees arriving in precarious boats on the shores of southern Europe, and of the makeshift camps that have sprung up in Lesbos, Lampedusa, Calais and elsewhere, have become familiar sights on television screens around the world. But what do we know about the border places these liminal zones between countries and continents that have become the focus of so much attention and anxiety today? READ MORE

Give & Take

Written by Lucie Félix | Candlewick Studio | September 2016
To play this game of opposites, press out a shape on each spread and turn the page to complete a new picture. READ MORE

Little Jewel

Written by Patrick Modiano | Translated by Penny Hueston | Yale University Press | August 23, 2016
One day in the corridors of the metro, nineteen-year-old Thérèse glimpses a woman in a yellow coat. Could this be the mother who long ago abandoned her? Is she still alive? Desperate for answers to questions that have tormented her since childhood, Thérèse pursues the mysterious figure on a quest through the streets of Paris. READ MORE

All My Treasures

Written by Jo Witek | Illustrated by Christine Roussey | Abrams Appleseed | August 23, 2016
When a girl receives a beautiful porcelain box from her grandmother, she immediately wants something special to put inside it. But what could it be? What does she love best? She loves jumping in puddles on rainy days, blowing bubbles in the park, and watching her little sister’s first steps. READ MORE

Bonesville

Written by Jean-Luc Fromental | Translated by Joëlle Jolivet | Abrams Books for Young Readers | August 16, 2016
A mysterious beast is terrorizing the resident skeletons of Bonesville. Under cover of darkness, it steals a different bone from each townsperson, from cranium to phalanges. It takes the washerwoman’s humerus, the butcher’s fibula, and Dr. Strongbones’s coccyx. READ MORE

The Little Communist Who Never Smiled

Written by Lola Lafon | Translated by Nick Caistor | Seven Stories Press | August 9, 2016
The Little Communist Who Never Smiled won ten prizes when it was released in France. This fictionalized account of the life of Nadia Comaneci, a child of communist Romania and an Olympic gymnast who inspired young girls around the globe, shows how a single athletic event mesmerizes the world and reverberates across nations. READ MORE

Marie Antoinette: Phantom Queen

Written by Annie Goetzinger & Rodolphe | NBM Graphic Novels| August 2016
During the 1930s, Maud, an artist, discovers she has a psychic gift. The first signs manifest themselves in the royal gardens of the Trianon where gradually she understands that a woman from the beyond is attempting to communicate with her. The revelation is beyond belief: it is the ghost of Marie Antoinette appearing to her to share a terrible secret that has tormented her for centuries. READ MORE

Contemporary African Cinema

Written by Olivier Barlet | Michigan State University Press | August 1, 2016
African and notably sub-Saharan African film’s relative eclipse on the international scene in the early twenty-first century does not transcend the growth within the African genre. This time period has seen African cinema forging a new relationship with the real and implementing new aesthetic strategies, as well as the emergence of a post-colonial popular cinema. READ MORE

The Song of the Dead

Written by Pierre Reverdy | Translated by Dan Bellm | Black Square Editions | July 2016
Written in the aftermath of World War II in northern France, where Reverdy was a partisan in the Resistance movement, "The Song of the Dead" is a remarkable document of dissociation and shattering, refraining from documentary or narrative in favor of revealing troubled states of soul. READ MORE

Leon the Raccoon Discovers the World

Written by Lucie Papineau | Translated by Susan Allen Maurin | Illustrated by Tommy Doyle | Auzou/Consortium | July 19, 2016
Will leaving the city change Leon's life forever? Get ready for an adventure! READ MORE

Pages

1/3
MORE IN books
authors on tour

Anaïs Depommier

SEPT 2017
US TOUR
authors on tour

Camille Laurens

SEPT 2017
US TOUR
authors on tour

Yanick Lahens

SEPT 2017
US TOUR
authors on tour

Christophe Boltanski

Oct 23-30, 2017
US TOUR