Hunting for the Mississippi

Written by Camille Bouchard | Translated by Peter McCambridge | Baraka Books | May 1, 2016

The year is 1684. Twelve-year-old Eustache Bréman leaves behind a life of misery begging on the streets of France for a second chance in the New World with with his mom, his sweetheart Marie-Élisabeth, and Marie-Élisabeth’s family. But life is tough, with plenty more tragedy and disappointment to come on Cavelier De La Salle’s ill-fated expedition to the Mississippi.

READ MORE

With Dad, It’s Like That

Written by Nadine Brun-Cosme | Illustrated by Magali Le Huche | Albert Whitman | May 1, 2016

When Mom’s at the movies, Dad is in charge for the night. And from lumpy potatoes to bathwater that’s a little too cold, nothing is quite right.

“That’s not how Mom does it,” Clara tells Dad. But she soon learns that Dad’s ways of doing things aren’t so bad—in fact, she even gets two bedtime stories! Being with Dad has its benefits; as her dad explains, “With me, it’s like that!”

READ MORE

Fragments of Place

Written by Aude | Translated by David Homel | Exile Editions | May 1, 2016
"Fragments of Place" asks all of us to be aware of the new pages of global history as they are written. Some of the stories in this collection are marked by war, social instability, totalitarianism, while others are peaceful and reassuring, but each emphasizes that great social movements call out for improvements to the common good, for true democracy without violence and with justice, for all citizens, including those yet to be born. READ MORE

Mr. Hulot at the Beach

Written by David Merveille | NorthSouth | May 1, 2016

From Publisher's Weekly:

READ MORE

New Baby!

Written by Stéphanie Blake | North South Books | April 2016

Simon is not pleased when his mother says, “SHHHH! You’ll have to play more quietly, we have a tiny new baby in the house.” So when Simon peeks into his baby brother’s room, he says: “Go home, New Baby!” But as they days pass, Simon soon realizes that New Baby is not going anywhere. And that maybe, just maybe, it’s okay.

Stephanie Blake’s hilarious and irreverent little bunny will tickle kids’ funny bones.

READ MORE

Wattana: An Orangutan in Paris

Written by Chris Herzfeld | Translated by Oliver Y. Martin and Robert D. Martin | University of Chicago Press | April 26, 2016
Offering a uniquely intimate look at the daily lives of captive great apes, Herzfeld uses Wattana’s life -an orangutan who lives in the Jardin des Plantes Zoo in Paris- to trace the history of orangutans from their first arrival in Europe in 1776 to the inhabitants of the Zoo of Paris and other zoos today. She provides a close look at the habits, technical know-how, and skills of Wattana, who, remarkably, uses strings, paper rolls, rope, and even pieces of wood to make things. And she thoughtfully explores how apes individually—and often with ingenuity—come to terms with and adapt to their captive environments and caretakers. READ MORE

Bird in a Cage

Written by Frédéric Dard | Translated by David Bellos | Pushkin Vertigo | April 16, 2016
30-year-old Albert returns to Paris after six years away, during which time his mother has passed away, to find himself entangled in a complicated case centred around a woman he met at a restaurant whose husband’s body appears in her lounge, but then disappears almost inexplicably. READ MORE

What Is Paleolithic Art?: Cave Paintings and the Dawn of Human Creativity

Written by Jean Clottes | Translated by Oliver Y. Martin and Robert D. Martin | University of Chicago Press | April 12, 2016
Was it a trick of the light that drew our Stone Age ancestors into caves to paint in charcoal and red hematite, to watch the heads of lions, likenesses of bison, horses, and aurochs in the reliefs of the walls, as they flickered by firelight? Or was it something deeper—a creative impulse, a spiritual dawn, a shamanistic conception of the world efflorescing in the dark, dank spaces beneath the surface of the earth where the spirits were literally at hand? READ MORE

One Hundred Twenty-One Days

Written by Michèle Audin | Translated by Christiana Hills | Deep Vellum | April 12, 2016

The debut novel of mathematician, author, and Oulipo member Michèle Audin, One Hundred Twenty-One Days retraces the lives of French mathematicians over several generations during World Wars I and II.

The narrative oscillates stylistically from chapter to chapter, sometimes resembling a novel, at others a fable, historical research, or a diary, locking and unlocking codes, culminating in a captivating, original reading experience.

"B+: multifarious and calculated, to good effect." --The Complete Review

READ MORE

Bardo or Not Bardo

Written by Antoine Volodine | Translated by J.T. Mahany | Open Letter | April 12, 2016

Once again, Volodine has demonstrated his range and ambition, crafting a moving, hysterical work about transformations and the power of the book.

In each of these seven vignettes, someone dies and has to make his way through the Tibetan afterlife, also known as the Bardo, where souls wander for forty-nine days before being reborn with the help of the Book of the Dead.

READ MORE

Paris Vagabond

Written by Jean-Paul Clébert | Translated by Donald Nicholson-Smith | NYRB | April 12, 2016
Jean-Paul Clébert was a boy from a respectable middle-class family who ran away from school, joined the French Resistance, and never looked back. Making his way to Paris at the end of World War II, Clébert took to living on the streets, and in Paris Vagabond, a so-called “aleatory novel” assembled out of sketches he jotted down at the time, he tells what it was like. READ MORE

Hill

Written by Jean Giono | Tranlsated by Paul Eprile | NYRB | April 5, 2016
Deep in Provence, a century ago, four stone houses perch on a hillside. The four houses have a dozen residents—and then there is Gagou, a mute drifter. Janet, the eldest of the men, is bedridden; he feels snakes writhing in his fingers and speaks in tongues. Even so, all is well until the village fountain suddenly stops running. From this point on, humans and the natural world are locked in a life-and-death struggle. All the elements—fire, water, earth, and air—come into play. READ MORE

Pages

1/3
MORE IN books
event

Talk with Catherine Cusset

FEB 28, 2017 | 7pm - 9pm
Alliance Française of Westchester
31 Mamaroneck Ave, (6th Floor)
White Plains, NY 10601
authors on tour

Christine Angot

October/November 2017
US tour
event

California Dreaming at Turn of the Corkscrew

MARCH 10, 2017 | 7pm
Turn of the Corkscrew Books and Wine
110 N. Park Avenue
Rockville Centre, NY 11570 United States
event

I'm Drawn This Way: Cartoonists on Cartooning - Pénélope Bagieu at Strand

MARCH 13, 2017 | 7:00pm – 9:00pm
Strand Book Store
828 Broadway, New York, New York 10003