Eve Out of Her Ruins

Written by Ananda Devi | Deep Vellum Publishing | September 13, 2016
With brutal honesty and poetic urgency, Ananda Devi relates the tale of four young Mauritians trapped in their country's endless cycle of fear and violence: Eve, whose body is her only weapon and source of power; Savita, Eve's best friend, the only one who loves Eve without self-interest, who has plans to leave but will not go alone; Saadiq, gifted would-be poet, inspired by Rimbaud, in love with Eve; Clélio, belligerent rebel, waiting without hope for his brother to send for him from France. READ MORE

About Phoenix

Written by Nastasia Rugani | Annick Press | September 1, 2016
How can the handsome, congenial Mr. Smith be the same man who terrorizes Phoenix and her sister? Should you get into the car of someone you barely know? Hard to resist when the driver is Jessup Smith, the best-looking teacher in school. That night, he drives sixteen-year-old Phoenix and her little sister Sasha—both brilliant misfits—home. READ MORE

Badawi

Written by Mohed Altrad | Grove Atlantic | September 6, 2016
Published to wide critical acclaim in France, "Badawi" is Mohed Altrad’s heartrending debut novel, inspired by the author’s own narrative arc from Bedouin orphan to engineer and finally billionaire businessman. READ MORE

Paul Gauguin & the Marquesas: Paradise Found?

Written by Caroline Boyle-Turner | Vagamundo | August 9, 2016
While the work Gauguin produced in Tahiti has been extensively catalogued and analyzed over the past century, his last years in Atuona on the island of Hiva Oa in the Marquesas have received only glancing attention. The art and writing from this period nonetheless show a deep engagement with questions of traditional Marquesan beliefs, colonial and church authority and changing definitions of “exotic”. Caroline Boyle-Turner focuses on the challenges Gauguin faced to intercede, invent, interpret or even ignore these complicated and often conflicting issues as he developed a powerful and poetic body of art. READ MORE

Giving Life, Giving Death

Written by Lucien Scubla | Michigan State University Press | September 1, 2016
Although women alone have the ability to bring children into the world, modern Western thought tends to discount this female prerogative. In "Giving Life, Giving Death", Lucien Scubla argues that structural anthropology sees women as objects of exchange that facilitate alliance-building rather than as vectors of continuity between generations. READ MORE

Equinoxes

Written by Cyril Pedrosa | NBM Publishing | September 2016
Segmented into four tableaux for four seasons, unrelated people of all social backgrounds seeking equilibrium cross paths with other solitudes, weaving in and out of one another's lives- all captivated and tormented by the enigmatic meaning of life. Every season has its visual identity and its individual voice, culminating in summer and, possibly, an answer. READ MORE

Borderlands: Towards an Anthropology of the Cosmopolitan Condition

Written by Michel Agier | Polity Press | August 29, 2016
The images of migrants and refugees arriving in precarious boats on the shores of southern Europe, and of the makeshift camps that have sprung up in Lesbos, Lampedusa, Calais and elsewhere, have become familiar sights on television screens around the world. But what do we know about the border places these liminal zones between countries and continents that have become the focus of so much attention and anxiety today? READ MORE

Give & Take

Written by Lucie Félix | Candlewick Studio | September 2016
To play this game of opposites, press out a shape on each spread and turn the page to complete a new picture. READ MORE

Little Jewel

Written by Patrick Modiano | Translated by Penny Hueston | Yale University Press | August 23, 2016
One day in the corridors of the metro, nineteen-year-old Thérèse glimpses a woman in a yellow coat. Could this be the mother who long ago abandoned her? Is she still alive? Desperate for answers to questions that have tormented her since childhood, Thérèse pursues the mysterious figure on a quest through the streets of Paris. READ MORE

All My Treasures

Written by Jo Witek | Illustrated by Christine Roussey | Abrams Appleseed | August 23, 2016
When a girl receives a beautiful porcelain box from her grandmother, she immediately wants something special to put inside it. But what could it be? What does she love best? She loves jumping in puddles on rainy days, blowing bubbles in the park, and watching her little sister’s first steps. READ MORE

Bonesville

Written by Jean-Luc Fromental | Translated by Joëlle Jolivet | Abrams Books for Young Readers | August 16, 2016
A mysterious beast is terrorizing the resident skeletons of Bonesville. Under cover of darkness, it steals a different bone from each townsperson, from cranium to phalanges. It takes the washerwoman’s humerus, the butcher’s fibula, and Dr. Strongbones’s coccyx. READ MORE

The Little Communist Who Never Smiled

Written by Lola Lafon | Translated by Nick Caistor | Seven Stories Press | August 9, 2016
The Little Communist Who Never Smiled won ten prizes when it was released in France. This fictionalized account of the life of Nadia Comaneci, a child of communist Romania and an Olympic gymnast who inspired young girls around the globe, shows how a single athletic event mesmerizes the world and reverberates across nations. READ MORE

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