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Feb23
Apr4
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On the Periphery at Potrero Stage Potrero Stage 1695 18th Street, San Francisco
Jan 27
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Raphaël Liogier FIAF Skyroom 22 East 60th Street, 8th Floor New York, NY 10022
Feb 25
Film Series
Sagan Embassy of France - La Maison Française 4101 Reservoir Road, NW - Washington, DC

Jewish Survival and Rescue in Occupied France

Join the Museum of Jewish Heritage for a two-day conference on Jewish survival and rescue in occupied France during the Second World War.

In Nazi-occupied France, nearly 75% of French Jews were able to survive the Holocaust despite the complicity of the Vichy government with the German authorities. This can be explained by the implementation of rescue networks by the Jews themselves, with the help of the population in certain “refuge” regions. This two-day conference is part of “France and Judaism: 2,000 Years of Intertwined History,” a series organized by the Consulate General of France in New York.

Eight speakers are going to participate to four sessions on these two days, including six French historians and experts. On March 4, come and listen to Jacques Semelin, historian and expert of France’s occupation during World War II, author of The Survival of the Jews in France: 1940-44, translated by Cynthia Schoch and Natasha Lehrer and published by C Hurst & Co Publishers Ltd in 2018; Patrick Cabanel, historian of Protestantism in France, author of numeros book including Histoire des Justes en France (History Of The Righteous In France), Armand-Colin, 2012; Johanna Lehr, political scientist specializing in Jewish resistance and author of De l'école au maquis: la Résistance juive en France (From School to Maquis: The Jewish Resistance In France), éditions Vendémiaire, 2014.

On March 5, the filmmaker Pierre Sauvage will be present to discuss his newly remastered documentary Weapons of the Spirit, as well as Nathalie Heinich, sociologist and Le Chambon village expert and Michèle Cone, former resident of Le Chambon.

Philip Nord, Rosengarten Professor of Modern and Contemporary History at Princeton, and Leah Pisar, president of the Aladdin Project that promotes intercultural dialogue through Holocaust education, will both also participate to the symposium.

Buy tickets here.

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