• Events
SEE ALL
Jan 23
Film Series
The French Minister Embassy of France - La Maison Française 4101 Reservoir Road, NW - Washington, DC
Jan 18
Film
The International Shorts Film Festival Embassy of France - La Maison Française 4101 Reservoir Road, NW - Washington, DC

French programs at BAMPFA

In January, several French movies will be screening at BAMPFA:

One Day in the Life of Andrei Arsenevich | Chris Marker (France, 2000)
Saturday, Jan 20, 2018 | 6 PM (90 mins)
After the screening, enjoy a Film to Table dinner at Babette, the cafe at BAMPFA. Join an intimate group of fellow filmgoers for a four-course, prix-fixe meal in a convivial, dinner-party atmosphere. Purchase dinner tickets in advance at babettecafe.com (film tickets must be purchased separately).

The Crime of Monsieur Lange | Jean Renoir (France, 1936)
Saturday, Jan 13, 2018 | 6 PM (84 mins)
Sunday, Jan 21, 2018 | 2 PM (84 mins)

On January 13, enjoy a Film to Table dinner at Babette, the cafe at BAMPFA. Join an intimate group of fellow filmgoers for a four-course, prix-fixe meal in a convivial, dinner-party atmosphere. Purchase dinner tickets in advance at babettecafe.com (film tickets must be purchased separately).

The Rules of the Game | Jean Renoir (France, 1939)
Sunday, Jan 14, 2018 | 4 PM (106 mins)
Friday, Jan 19, 2018 | PM (106 mins)

In Renoir’s masterpiece of ruthless grace, made between the Munich accords and the outbreak of war, history plays as both tragedy and farce. This self-declared “dramatic fantasy” à la Beaumarchais and de Musset etches, in the director’s words, “a rich, complex society . . . dancing on a volcano.” It uses the construct of a country-house gathering, with its shooting party and masquerade, its shifting romantic allegiances and upstairs-downstairs micro-melodramas, to frame a portrait of respectable civilization that is both seductive and monstrous. It is Renoir’s special gift to combine entomological precision with genuine compassion for each of his many characters, including the Marquis de la Chesnaye (Marcel Dalio), collector of automatons; his wistful wife Christine (Nora Grégor), who complains “telling lies is such a heavy load to bear”; and their bearish friend Octave (Renoir), whose remark sums up the film’s philosophy in all its damning ambiguity: “Everyone has their reasons.” Juliet Clark

 

 

 

 

 

 

RELATED