The Cultural Services of the French Embassy, in partnership with the Film Department at the National Gallery of Art and the Embassy of Georgia, present three screenings by Georgian-French filmmaker, Otar Iosseliani, and Georgian filmmaker, Tengiz Abuladze.

The films presented at the Embassy of France are part of the retrospective Discovering Georgian Cinema, which examines a century of filmmaking and is organized by the National Gallery of Art from January 12 through March 31, 2015 in different cultural centers in Washington, D.C. 


ONCE UPON A TIME THERE WAS A SINGING BLACKBIRD 

(preceded by AKVARELI and SAPOVNELA)

Wednesday, February 4 | 7:00 p.m.

Otar Iosseliani was born in Tbilisi in 1934 and has been living and working in France since the 1980s. In Once Upon a Time There Was a Singing Blackbird, Iosseliani creates a wry comedy around an amiable musician who refuses to conform - he is forever late for his concerts, neglectful of his appointments, and he continually finds ways to avoid work. One day, things begin to change. (Directed by Otar Iosseliani, 1971, 83 minutes)   

In Akvareli, a poor family's tedious existence is deeply and unexpectedly changed by art. (Directed by Otar Iosseliani, 1958, 10 minutes)

Sapovnela, the director's first film in color, is a tale about a man who has to make way for a road through the blossoming garden that he loves. (Directed by Otar Iosseliani, 1959, 18 minutes)

Admission is free, but reservations are required here

 

PASTORALE 

(preceded by TUDZHI)

Friday, February 6 | 7:00 p.m.

Set in a rural Georgian village, the story offered by Pastorale was awarded the International Critics' Prize at the 1975 Berlinale. Four young musicians, seeking the solace of a rural village for their intense summer rehearsals, become unavoidably entangled in local village life. Pastorale examines the things that should be cherished in human interactions, while still maintaining its satirical tone. (Directed by Otar Iosseliani, 1975, 95 minutes)

The short Tudzhi (Cast Iron) wordlessly portrays the daily routine at an ironworks, not through the appeal of the heavy machinery or the achievements of the Soviet steel industry, but rather through the lives of the people who work at the plant. (Directed by Otar Iosseliani, 1964, 17 minutes)

Admission is free, but reservations are required here

THE WISHING TREE

Tuesday, March 31 | 7:00 p.m.

Folklore and legend shape The Wishing Tree, a pastoral film set in a picturesque, pre-Revolution Georgia. Spanning four seasons in the lives of an assortment of village characters, more than twenty moral tales are folded into the narrative, centering on a beautiful young woman forced to marry a man she does not love.

One tale involves a village eccentric looking for a legendary tree that grants miracles. Although death opens the film, The Wishing Tree overflows with life. The film is based on author Georgi Leonidze's original story set in the province of Kakheti, the birthplace of renowned primitivist painter Pirosmani. (Directed by Tengiz Abuladze, 1977, 107 minutes)

Admission is free, but reservations are required here


All films will be screened in Georgian with English subtitles, except for Akvareli and Sapovnela, which do not have any English subtitles but will be presented by Julie Christensen, professor in the Modern and Classical Languages Department at George Mason University.

To celebrate the last screening of this film retrospective, the Embassy of Georgia to the United States will offer a tasting of Georgian wine on March 31 after the screening of The Wishing Tree at the Embassy of France. 

For more information on the film retrospective, Discovering Georgian Cinema, please click here

Embassy of France 4101 Reservoir Road NW Washington, DC 20009

Discovering Georgian Cinema

When
February 4, February 6 and March 31, 2015 | 7:00 p.m.
Where
Embassy of France
4101 Reservoir Road NW
Washington, DC 20009
film still from The Wishing Tree. Courtesy: University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

The Cultural Services of the French Embassy, in partnership with the Film Department at the National Gallery of Art and the Embassy of Georgia, present three screenings by Georgian-French filmmaker, Otar Iosseliani, and Georgian filmmaker, Tengiz Abuladze.

The films presented at the Embassy of France are part of the retrospective Discovering Georgian Cinema, which examines a century of filmmaking and is organized by the National Gallery of Art from January 12 through March 31, 2015 in different cultural centers in Washington, D.C. 


ONCE UPON A TIME THERE WAS A SINGING BLACKBIRD 

(preceded by AKVARELI and SAPOVNELA)

Wednesday, February 4 | 7:00 p.m.

Otar Iosseliani was born in Tbilisi in 1934 and has been living and working in France since the 1980s. In Once Upon a Time There Was a Singing Blackbird, Iosseliani creates a wry comedy around an amiable musician who refuses to conform - he is forever late for his concerts, neglectful of his appointments, and he continually finds ways to avoid work. One day, things begin to change. (Directed by Otar Iosseliani, 1971, 83 minutes)   

In Akvareli, a poor family's tedious existence is deeply and unexpectedly changed by art. (Directed by Otar Iosseliani, 1958, 10 minutes)

Sapovnela, the director's first film in color, is a tale about a man who has to make way for a road through the blossoming garden that he loves. (Directed by Otar Iosseliani, 1959, 18 minutes)

Admission is free, but reservations are required here

 

PASTORALE 

(preceded by TUDZHI)

Friday, February 6 | 7:00 p.m.

Set in a rural Georgian village, the story offered by Pastorale was awarded the International Critics' Prize at the 1975 Berlinale. Four young musicians, seeking the solace of a rural village for their intense summer rehearsals, become unavoidably entangled in local village life. Pastorale examines the things that should be cherished in human interactions, while still maintaining its satirical tone. (Directed by Otar Iosseliani, 1975, 95 minutes)

The short Tudzhi (Cast Iron) wordlessly portrays the daily routine at an ironworks, not through the appeal of the heavy machinery or the achievements of the Soviet steel industry, but rather through the lives of the people who work at the plant. (Directed by Otar Iosseliani, 1964, 17 minutes)

Admission is free, but reservations are required here

THE WISHING TREE

Tuesday, March 31 | 7:00 p.m.

Folklore and legend shape The Wishing Tree, a pastoral film set in a picturesque, pre-Revolution Georgia. Spanning four seasons in the lives of an assortment of village characters, more than twenty moral tales are folded into the narrative, centering on a beautiful young woman forced to marry a man she does not love.

One tale involves a village eccentric looking for a legendary tree that grants miracles. Although death opens the film, The Wishing Tree overflows with life. The film is based on author Georgi Leonidze's original story set in the province of Kakheti, the birthplace of renowned primitivist painter Pirosmani. (Directed by Tengiz Abuladze, 1977, 107 minutes)

Admission is free, but reservations are required here


All films will be screened in Georgian with English subtitles, except for Akvareli and Sapovnela, which do not have any English subtitles but will be presented by Julie Christensen, professor in the Modern and Classical Languages Department at George Mason University.

To celebrate the last screening of this film retrospective, the Embassy of Georgia to the United States will offer a tasting of Georgian wine on March 31 after the screening of The Wishing Tree at the Embassy of France. 

For more information on the film retrospective, Discovering Georgian Cinema, please click here

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