In recognition of the centennial of World War I, Austin Film Society, the Harry Ransom Center of the University of Texas, and Paramount-Stateside Theaters are presenting a series of films in conjunction with the Ransom Center’s current exhibit, The World at War,1914-1918. Lasting over four years and resulting in at least 9,000,000 deaths, the Great War was fought from the air, at sea, and down in the trenches. Chemical warfare, genocide, and new military technology wreaked havoc on European countries and both mighty empires and tiny kingdoms disappeared, swallowed up by defeat or revolution.

Almost immediately filmmakers saw perfect cinematic subjects in the massive upheavals, death, destruction, regime changes, and heroism of World War I. Many took the opportunity to decry the horrors of war and to try to turn people toward pacifism. Even after an even more horrific world war occupied people’s minds, the first one remained fertile ground for new cinematic explorations.

Austin Film Society will be focusing on four films in June, all classics by world-famous auteurs Stanley Kubrick, Francois Truffaut, Abel Gance, and Michael Powell/Emeric Pressburger. For the complete list of films presented by AFS, the Ransom Center, and Paramount-Stateside, visit the Ransom Center Event Page.

JULES ET JIM

Written by François Truffaut and Jean Gruault, from the novel by Henri-Pierre Roché
Cast: Jeanne Moreau, Oskar Werner, Henri Serre
France, 1962

Enamored of the semi-autobiographical novel by Henri-Pierre Roché, François Truffaut had hoped to begin his feature film career with an adaptation of Jules et Jim, but wisely realized he did not yet have the life experiences to do it well. After the success of 400 BLOWS and the financial failure of SHOOT THE PIANO PLAYER, the young director, now more experienced in life and his art, began writing a new adaptation of the novel with the help of Jean Gruault. Together they would create a screenplay containing a delightful defense of amour a trois.

Thursday, June 19 I 7:30 PM

J'ACCUSE

Cinematography by Marc Bujard, Léonce-Henri Burel, and Maurice Forster
Editing by Andrée Danis and Abel Gance
Cast: Romuald Joubé, Séverin-Mars, Maryse Dauvray, Maxime Desjardins
France, 1919

Abel Gance was an idealist who dreamed of the horrors of World War I being redeemed by a new society – pacifist and poetic. Making J’ACCUSE! during and immediately after the Great War, Gance hoped to inspire such ideals in his audiences in France and beyond. Taking his title from an 1898 tract by novelist Emile Zola, who accused the French government of hypocrisy and anti-Semitism in its persecution of Captain Alfred Dreyfus, Abel Gance had his own list of people and entities to accuse for the Great War of 1914-1918:  certainly Germany, but also members of the French government and military. More importantly he accused some French people of profiting from the war or enjoying life while their men suffered or died in warfare. The only way they could redeem themselves in his mind would be to remember and honor those who had died or who had been wounded physically or mentally and to then work hard to insure that such a cataclysm would never happen again.

Thursday, June 26 I 7:30 PM

For more information, visit the Austin Film Society Website

Austin Film Society 6226 Middle Fiskville Rd

French Films at the Austin Film Society

When
June 19 - 26, 2014
Where
Austin Film Society
6226 Middle Fiskville Rd

In recognition of the centennial of World War I, Austin Film Society, the Harry Ransom Center of the University of Texas, and Paramount-Stateside Theaters are presenting a series of films in conjunction with the Ransom Center’s current exhibit, The World at War,1914-1918. Lasting over four years and resulting in at least 9,000,000 deaths, the Great War was fought from the air, at sea, and down in the trenches. Chemical warfare, genocide, and new military technology wreaked havoc on European countries and both mighty empires and tiny kingdoms disappeared, swallowed up by defeat or revolution.

Almost immediately filmmakers saw perfect cinematic subjects in the massive upheavals, death, destruction, regime changes, and heroism of World War I. Many took the opportunity to decry the horrors of war and to try to turn people toward pacifism. Even after an even more horrific world war occupied people’s minds, the first one remained fertile ground for new cinematic explorations.

Austin Film Society will be focusing on four films in June, all classics by world-famous auteurs Stanley Kubrick, Francois Truffaut, Abel Gance, and Michael Powell/Emeric Pressburger. For the complete list of films presented by AFS, the Ransom Center, and Paramount-Stateside, visit the Ransom Center Event Page.

JULES ET JIM

Written by François Truffaut and Jean Gruault, from the novel by Henri-Pierre Roché
Cast: Jeanne Moreau, Oskar Werner, Henri Serre
France, 1962

Enamored of the semi-autobiographical novel by Henri-Pierre Roché, François Truffaut had hoped to begin his feature film career with an adaptation of Jules et Jim, but wisely realized he did not yet have the life experiences to do it well. After the success of 400 BLOWS and the financial failure of SHOOT THE PIANO PLAYER, the young director, now more experienced in life and his art, began writing a new adaptation of the novel with the help of Jean Gruault. Together they would create a screenplay containing a delightful defense of amour a trois.

Thursday, June 19 I 7:30 PM

J'ACCUSE

Cinematography by Marc Bujard, Léonce-Henri Burel, and Maurice Forster
Editing by Andrée Danis and Abel Gance
Cast: Romuald Joubé, Séverin-Mars, Maryse Dauvray, Maxime Desjardins
France, 1919

Abel Gance was an idealist who dreamed of the horrors of World War I being redeemed by a new society – pacifist and poetic. Making J’ACCUSE! during and immediately after the Great War, Gance hoped to inspire such ideals in his audiences in France and beyond. Taking his title from an 1898 tract by novelist Emile Zola, who accused the French government of hypocrisy and anti-Semitism in its persecution of Captain Alfred Dreyfus, Abel Gance had his own list of people and entities to accuse for the Great War of 1914-1918:  certainly Germany, but also members of the French government and military. More importantly he accused some French people of profiting from the war or enjoying life while their men suffered or died in warfare. The only way they could redeem themselves in his mind would be to remember and honor those who had died or who had been wounded physically or mentally and to then work hard to insure that such a cataclysm would never happen again.

Thursday, June 26 I 7:30 PM

For more information, visit the Austin Film Society Website

Comments are moderated and generally will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive.
Sign in or register to post comments.
more events
1/3
ONGOING EVENTS
event

"Woman with a movie camera : female directors before 1950" series at Anthology Film Archives

September 15 - 28, 2016
Anthology Film Archive
32 Second Avenue New York, NY 10003
1/3
recomended for you
event

"French Flick & Picnic" at the Gate Museum in Atlanta

09/30/2016
The Gate Museum
395 17th St NW, Atlanta, GA 30363
event

30th Annual Wine Country Film Festival

September 21, 2016 - September 26, 2016
Various locations, Sonoma Valley
Sonoma Valley
event

Seattle French Cinema Now 2016

September 29, 2016 - October 6, 2016
Seattle
Seattle
event

Tania Mouraud: Everyday Ogres

Sep. 23 - Dec. 10, 2016
Visual Arts Center - The University of Texas at Austin - Art Building
23rd and Trinity Streets
Austin, Texas 78712