To honor French filmmaker and actress Mati Diop, who recently received the Geneviève McMillan-Reba Stewart Fellowship, the Harvard Film Archive will be showing a selection of her films as well as the lankmark film Touki bouki (1973), directed by her uncle, renowned Senegalese filmmaker Djibril Diop Mambéty. Mati Diop will be attending the screenings on February 6 & 7.

For more information, click here.

Program

Friday, February 6 at 7 p.m.


A Thousand Suns (Mille Soleils), directed by Mati Diop, 2013, 45 minutes. French and Wolof with English subtitles.

Fusing documentary and fantasy in homage to her uncle’s masterpiece Touki Bouki, Diop follows Magaye Niang, the actor who played the lead in the 1973 film, to a screening of the movie, as the old man comes to terms with the vanished past he longs for and the future he still hopes is possible. A Thousand Suns is intimately entwined with Diop's own family, the troubled history of Senegal, and its cinema.

Saturday, February 7 at 7 p.m.
 

Atlantiques, directed by Mati Diop, 2009, 15 minutes. Wolof and French with English subtitles.

Sitting before a beachside fire, three friends discuss the merits and dangers of crossing the sea to Europe by pirogue, a small, fragile fishing vessel. “Forget Europe,” a friend urges. “Let’s speak of here, Africa.” There’s talk of family, of sacrifice, and even of magical transformation from man into fish, sometimes little more than voices in the dark.

Big in Vietnam, directed by Mati Diop, 2012, 29 minutes. French with English subtitles.

After her lead actor goes missing, a movie director, Henriette, abandons the set of her film and wanders the streets of Marseille, where she meets a mysterious man who will help her find the sensual quality she had been seeking in her art.


 

Snow Canon, directed by Mati Diop, 2011, 33 minutes. French with English subtitles.

Snow Canon, a coming-of-age story catalyzed by an erotic encounter between a teenage girl and an American babysitter, is inspired by events from Diop’s own life, along with touches of the Stendhal short story “Vanina Vanini.” At the young girl's family chalet, the shades are perpetually drawn, creating for the pair a private, sensual world set against the magisterial French Alps outside.

Monday, February 9 at 7 p.m.


Touki bouki, directed by Djibril Diop Mambéty, Senegal, 1973, 89 minutes.

The debut feature of Senegalese filmmaker Djibril Diop Mambéty, Touki bouki stands today as one of the classics of African cinema and of 1970s world cinema. Built out of a rich montage of sights and sounds, Touki bouki is exuberantly syncretic, as is the relationship between its two protagonists: a charismatic cowboy-turned-biker and a young student who meet in Dakar and dream of going to Europe.



 

Harvard Film Archive Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge

Mati Diop at the HFA

When
February 6-9, 2015
Where
Harvard Film Archive
Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts
24 Quincy Street, Cambridge

To honor French filmmaker and actress Mati Diop, who recently received the Geneviève McMillan-Reba Stewart Fellowship, the Harvard Film Archive will be showing a selection of her films as well as the lankmark film Touki bouki (1973), directed by her uncle, renowned Senegalese filmmaker Djibril Diop Mambéty. Mati Diop will be attending the screenings on February 6 & 7.

For more information, click here.

Program

Friday, February 6 at 7 p.m.


A Thousand Suns (Mille Soleils), directed by Mati Diop, 2013, 45 minutes. French and Wolof with English subtitles.

Fusing documentary and fantasy in homage to her uncle’s masterpiece Touki Bouki, Diop follows Magaye Niang, the actor who played the lead in the 1973 film, to a screening of the movie, as the old man comes to terms with the vanished past he longs for and the future he still hopes is possible. A Thousand Suns is intimately entwined with Diop's own family, the troubled history of Senegal, and its cinema.

Saturday, February 7 at 7 p.m.
 

Atlantiques, directed by Mati Diop, 2009, 15 minutes. Wolof and French with English subtitles.

Sitting before a beachside fire, three friends discuss the merits and dangers of crossing the sea to Europe by pirogue, a small, fragile fishing vessel. “Forget Europe,” a friend urges. “Let’s speak of here, Africa.” There’s talk of family, of sacrifice, and even of magical transformation from man into fish, sometimes little more than voices in the dark.

Big in Vietnam, directed by Mati Diop, 2012, 29 minutes. French with English subtitles.

After her lead actor goes missing, a movie director, Henriette, abandons the set of her film and wanders the streets of Marseille, where she meets a mysterious man who will help her find the sensual quality she had been seeking in her art.


 

Snow Canon, directed by Mati Diop, 2011, 33 minutes. French with English subtitles.

Snow Canon, a coming-of-age story catalyzed by an erotic encounter between a teenage girl and an American babysitter, is inspired by events from Diop’s own life, along with touches of the Stendhal short story “Vanina Vanini.” At the young girl's family chalet, the shades are perpetually drawn, creating for the pair a private, sensual world set against the magisterial French Alps outside.

Monday, February 9 at 7 p.m.


Touki bouki, directed by Djibril Diop Mambéty, Senegal, 1973, 89 minutes.

The debut feature of Senegalese filmmaker Djibril Diop Mambéty, Touki bouki stands today as one of the classics of African cinema and of 1970s world cinema. Built out of a rich montage of sights and sounds, Touki bouki is exuberantly syncretic, as is the relationship between its two protagonists: a charismatic cowboy-turned-biker and a young student who meet in Dakar and dream of going to Europe.

 



 

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