The history of women’s role in film production is far more complicated than one might assume. Indeed, in the medium’s infancy – throughout the silent era – women had a stronger presence behind the camera than at any other period since. A multitude of women worked as screenwriters, crew members, and even directors during the period in which the industry was in formation.

Despite the remarkable achievements of these early female film directors, many of them remain little known or studied even today, an indication that the social and economic forces mobilized against them not only continue to exist, but also extend to the realm of film studies.This series encompasses more than twenty works by women who succeeded in directing their own films in the decades before 1950. Including rare archival and imported prints, spotlights on early filmmakers such as Gene Gauntier, Alice Guy-Blaché, Germaine Dulac, and others, and the premiere of a new restoration of Lois Weber’s SHOES (screening for the first time in the modern era with the original American intertitles), this series is not to be missed.

More information about the series and full program here


Saturday, September 17 - 6:45pm
Friday, September 23 - 9:15pm

WOMAN WITH A MOVIE CAMERA: ALICE GUY-BLACHÉ

This program will be introduced by Joy Schaefer & Sofia Varino of the Woman with a Movie Camera project; Joy Schaefer will introduce on Sat, Sept 17 and Sofia Varino on Fri, Sept 23!

THE DRUNKEN MATTRESS / LE MATELAS ALCOOLIQUE (France, 1906, 7 min, 35mm, b&w, silent. Print courtesy of the Library of Congress.)
THE STRIKE (U.S., 1912, 12 min, 35mm, b&w, silent. Print courtesy of the British Film Institute.)
THE NEW LOVE AND THE OLD (U.S., 1912, 5 min, 35mm, b&w, silent. Print courtesy of the John E Allen Archive at the Library of Congress; lab work undertaken by Cinema Arts Inc.)
THE ROADS THAT LEAD HOME (U.S., 1913, 10 min, 35mm, b&w, silent. Print courtesy of the John E Allen Archive at the Library of Congress; lab work undertaken by Cinema Arts Inc.) & Marquise Lepage
THE LOST GARDEN: THE LIFE AND CINEMA OF ALICE GUY-BLACHÉ
(Canada, 1995, 53 min, digital)
Looks at the life and times of Guy-Blaché (1873-1968), arguably the first narrative filmmaker in the world. Lepage intercuts clips from her films with revealing excerpts from TV interviews with Guy-Blaché herself, photographs, reminiscences by family members, and interviews with film historians.

Total running time: ca. 90 min.


Saturday, September 17 - 9:00pm
Sunday, September 25 - 6:00pm


The screening on Sun, Sept 25 will be introduced by Joy Schaefer & Sofia Varino of the Woman with a Movie Camera project!
WOMAN WITH A MOVIE CAMERA: GERMAINE DULAC & ROSA PORTEN

THE SMILING MADAME BEUDET / LA SOURIANTE MADAME BEUDET
(Directed by Germaine Dulac, 1923, 40 min, 16mm, b&w, silent)
MADAME BEUDET explores the relationship of a bored couple in a dreary provincial town from the woman’s point of view. Basing her film on a play by Andre Obey and Denys Amiel, the director translates into cinema their aesthetic of the “theater of silence,” a theory that the silences engulfing characters could be more articulate than their speech. Silent actions betray the conflicts in the marriage, and inanimate objects are made to carry psychological meaning. Dulac shows us Madame Beudet’s view of her husband through a distorting lens, or her own romantic imagination in abstract visions.

THE SEASHELL AND THE CLERGYMAN / LA COQUILLE ET LE CLERGYMAN
(Directed by Germaine Dulac, France, 1928, 39 min, 16mm, b&w, silent. Written by Antonin Artaud.)
This famous early surrealist film is packed with Freudian references, and at the same time represents a spirited attack on the Church. Originally a drama critic, always a feminist, the filmmaker Germaine Dulac employed a fantastic symbolism to probe the mind of a cleric whose religious vows deny his normal sexual impulses. Nevertheless, it was originally banned by the British Board of Censors, which issued the statement that, “The film is so cryptic as to be almost meaningless. If there is a meaning, it is doubtless objectionable.”

THE LATEST VARIETY SENSATION / DER NEUESTE STERN VOM VARIÉTÉ
(Directe by Rosa Porten & Franz EcksteinGermany 1917, 32 min, 35mm-to-digital. Digital restoration courtesy of EYE Film Museum.)
“This nearly complete comedy…is a most recent discovery and a rare item among the surviving Rosa Porten films. Porten wrote, co-directed, and played the role of the variety artiste Stella Orlanda, an intrepid young woman maneuvering between bourgeois mentality and the free spirit attributed to popular stage people.” –Annette Förster, IL CINEMA RITROVATO

Total running time: ca. 115 min.
 

Anthology Film Archive 32 Second Avenue New York, NY 10003

"Woman with a movie camera : female directors before 1950" series at Anthology Film Archives

When
September 15 - 28, 2016
Where
Anthology Film Archive
32 Second Avenue New York, NY 10003
"La souriante madame Beudet" by Germaine Dulac

The history of women’s role in film production is far more complicated than one might assume. Indeed, in the medium’s infancy – throughout the silent era – women had a stronger presence behind the camera than at any other period since. A multitude of women worked as screenwriters, crew members, and even directors during the period in which the industry was in formation.

Despite the remarkable achievements of these early female film directors, many of them remain little known or studied even today, an indication that the social and economic forces mobilized against them not only continue to exist, but also extend to the realm of film studies.This series encompasses more than twenty works by women who succeeded in directing their own films in the decades before 1950. Including rare archival and imported prints, spotlights on early filmmakers such as Gene Gauntier, Alice Guy-Blaché, Germaine Dulac, and others, and the premiere of a new restoration of Lois Weber’s SHOES (screening for the first time in the modern era with the original American intertitles), this series is not to be missed.

More information about the series and full program here


Saturday, September 17 - 6:45pm
Friday, September 23 - 9:15pm

WOMAN WITH A MOVIE CAMERA: ALICE GUY-BLACHÉ

This program will be introduced by Joy Schaefer & Sofia Varino of the Woman with a Movie Camera project; Joy Schaefer will introduce on Sat, Sept 17 and Sofia Varino on Fri, Sept 23!

THE DRUNKEN MATTRESS / LE MATELAS ALCOOLIQUE (France, 1906, 7 min, 35mm, b&w, silent. Print courtesy of the Library of Congress.)
THE STRIKE (U.S., 1912, 12 min, 35mm, b&w, silent. Print courtesy of the British Film Institute.)
THE NEW LOVE AND THE OLD (U.S., 1912, 5 min, 35mm, b&w, silent. Print courtesy of the John E Allen Archive at the Library of Congress; lab work undertaken by Cinema Arts Inc.)
THE ROADS THAT LEAD HOME (U.S., 1913, 10 min, 35mm, b&w, silent. Print courtesy of the John E Allen Archive at the Library of Congress; lab work undertaken by Cinema Arts Inc.) & Marquise Lepage
THE LOST GARDEN: THE LIFE AND CINEMA OF ALICE GUY-BLACHÉ
(Canada, 1995, 53 min, digital)
Looks at the life and times of Guy-Blaché (1873-1968), arguably the first narrative filmmaker in the world. Lepage intercuts clips from her films with revealing excerpts from TV interviews with Guy-Blaché herself, photographs, reminiscences by family members, and interviews with film historians.

Total running time: ca. 90 min.


Saturday, September 17 - 9:00pm
Sunday, September 25 - 6:00pm


The screening on Sun, Sept 25 will be introduced by Joy Schaefer & Sofia Varino of the Woman with a Movie Camera project!
WOMAN WITH A MOVIE CAMERA: GERMAINE DULAC & ROSA PORTEN

THE SMILING MADAME BEUDET / LA SOURIANTE MADAME BEUDET
(Directed by Germaine Dulac, 1923, 40 min, 16mm, b&w, silent)
MADAME BEUDET explores the relationship of a bored couple in a dreary provincial town from the woman’s point of view. Basing her film on a play by Andre Obey and Denys Amiel, the director translates into cinema their aesthetic of the “theater of silence,” a theory that the silences engulfing characters could be more articulate than their speech. Silent actions betray the conflicts in the marriage, and inanimate objects are made to carry psychological meaning. Dulac shows us Madame Beudet’s view of her husband through a distorting lens, or her own romantic imagination in abstract visions.

THE SEASHELL AND THE CLERGYMAN / LA COQUILLE ET LE CLERGYMAN
(Directed by Germaine Dulac, France, 1928, 39 min, 16mm, b&w, silent. Written by Antonin Artaud.)
This famous early surrealist film is packed with Freudian references, and at the same time represents a spirited attack on the Church. Originally a drama critic, always a feminist, the filmmaker Germaine Dulac employed a fantastic symbolism to probe the mind of a cleric whose religious vows deny his normal sexual impulses. Nevertheless, it was originally banned by the British Board of Censors, which issued the statement that, “The film is so cryptic as to be almost meaningless. If there is a meaning, it is doubtless objectionable.”

THE LATEST VARIETY SENSATION / DER NEUESTE STERN VOM VARIÉTÉ
(Directe by Rosa Porten & Franz EcksteinGermany 1917, 32 min, 35mm-to-digital. Digital restoration courtesy of EYE Film Museum.)
“This nearly complete comedy…is a most recent discovery and a rare item among the surviving Rosa Porten films. Porten wrote, co-directed, and played the role of the variety artiste Stella Orlanda, an intrepid young woman maneuvering between bourgeois mentality and the free spirit attributed to popular stage people.” –Annette Förster, IL CINEMA RITROVATO

Total running time: ca. 115 min.
 

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