Celebrating Young French Cinema at FIAF

January 8, 2013 | By Laura Pertuy
Léa Seydoux in "Dear Prudence" by Rebecca Zlotowski

As the Vive la jeunesse! series kicked off last Tuesday at the French Institute Alliance Française (FIAF) in New York City (see event page), we wanted to offer some insight into the curatorial ideas behind the program. Co-curators Marie Losier (experimental filmmaker) and Clémentine Gallot (journalist and Cahiers du cinema writer), answered our questions...

Can you tell us about the origins of this project ?
This series came from a common desire with Clémentine to do a film series together. Clémentine who is a dear friend, a great writer for Cahiers du cinema and MK2, as well as a cinéphile, worked with me at FIAF years ago for a short period of time. We always wanted to find the right moment and the right subject for the series and finally we did ! 

Was it linked to a precise agenda or was it more of an improvised idea ?
We both wanted to show films from young filmmakers, some known, some not, but of today's young generation, that are rarely shown in NY and most never shown before, with shorts and features. We both made a list, a very exciting, long one actually. Mine came from many experiences I had during this year being on many different film jurys, and that is how I chose to show the two last films from FID Marseille that won the French competition I was on. Song Song and La Nuit Remue are both wonderful films, filled with grace, invention; they’re moving and so refreshing. Clémentine helped me discover many French directors, that I had not been exposed to in the US, such as the films Le Marin Masqué, Ce qu'il restera de nous, Un monde sans femmes... These were great discoveries for me and I hope they will be for our audiences as well.

                                     

                                  Le marin masqué by Sophie Letourneur © Shellac

Mia Hansen Love's and Rebecca Zlotowski’s films were the only features that had been screened in NYC in festivals and were distributed in commercial theaters. They are wonderful films and we wanted to show them in this context as a way to establish the other films in the series on the same level, even if they are lesser known because many have never been screened in the US.

There appears to be recurring motifs in this program, especially in terms of naturalism and references to the New Wave. How do you account for this ?
I feel all these films have in common their freshness, a strong sense of naturalism in the acting and setting, a strong sense of personal touch from each filmmaker. None of these films follow a set formula, and there’s maybe a touch of new wave in the idea of freedom, naturalism, and their way of often breaking the mold. 

                                   

                                     Un monde sans femmes by Guillaume Brac © NIZ


Upcoming Screenings

Short Films & Features
Le Marin masqué & Dear Prudence
Tuesday, January 15, 2013
12:30, 4, & 7:30pm

Double Screening
What We’ll Leave Behind & A World Without Women
Tuesday, January 22, 2013
12:30, 4, & 7:30pm

U.S. Premiers & Double Screening
Song Song & La nuit remue
Tuesday, January 29, 2013
12:30, 4 & 7:30pm

More info @ FIAF

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