The Cultural Service of the French Embassy, in partnership with Reporters Without Borders, is proud to present Revolutions: Photographs of the Arab Spring by Rémi Ochlik, a French photojournalist who received several prestigious awards, including the first prize in the general news category at the World Press Photo Awards 2012 for his work in Libya. He was killed on February 22, 2012, during the bombardment of a media center in Homs, Syria. Veteran American journalist Marie Colvin was killed in the same attack. This exhibition presents 55 photographs captured by Ochlik during the Arab Spring.

About Rémi Ochlik

Rémi Ochlik was only 28 years old when he died, cutting short an impressive career as a photojournalist specializing in the coverage of global conflicts.

Born in eastern France in 1983, he studied photography at Icart Photo School and worked for Wostok, a photography agency. In 2004, at the age of 20, he went to Haiti to photograph riots surrounding the ouster of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. It was Ochlik's first conflict experience. The resulting work was distinguished by the Francois Chalais Award for Young Reporters and was projected at the Visa pour l’Image International Photojournalism Festival. In 2005 he founded his own photography agency IP3 PRESS, with the goal of covering news in Paris and conflicts around the world.

He covered the war in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 2008, the cholera epidemic and the 2010 presidential elections in Haiti. In 2011, Ochlik covered the “Arab Spring,” photographing the Tunisian and Egyptian revolutions as well as the uprising and war in Libya. His work was published in Le Monde Magazine, VSD, Paris Match, Time Magazine and The Wall Street Journal.

About the exhibition

Rémi Ochlik arrived in Tunisia on January 13, 2011, one day before President Ben Ali fled the country. He went to Sidi Bouzidto visit the grave of Mohamed Bouazizi. Educated but unemployed, Bouazizi was trying to feed his family by selling fruits and vegetables when the police confiscated his produce cart. In an act of desperation and anger, he doused him­self with paint thinner and set himself on fire on December 17. This act triggered the unfolding political crisis in Tunisia that would set the whole Arab world on fire.

In February, Ochlik ventured into Tahrir Square, the epicenter of protests against the Egyptian government. At the Tunisian-Libyan border, Ochlik documented the waves of refugees, mostly migrant workers from Egypt and Bangladesh.

In March, Ochlik entered Libya where he worked for months documenting the fall of Tripoli and the death of Qaddafi.

On February 21, 2012, Ochlik reached Syria: “I just arrived in Homs. It’s night­time but the situation seems incredibly tense and desperate. I’ll start making pictures tomorrow.”

He never did.

This exhibition is made possible thanks to the generous support of 

and is brought in collaboration with 

           

Special thanks to the Press and Communication Office of the French Embassy in Washington, D.C. 

For more information and reservations, please click here

La Maison Francaise - Embassy of France 4101 Reservoir Road, NW Washington, D.C. 20007

Photographs of Rémi Ochlik

When
Oct 2 - Oct 25, 2013
Where
La Maison Francaise - Embassy of France
4101 Reservoir Road, NW
Washington, D.C. 20007
Libya, Ras Lanouf, March 2011. © Rémi Ochlik/IP3

The Cultural Service of the French Embassy, in partnership with Reporters Without Borders, is proud to present Revolutions: Photographs of the Arab Spring by Rémi Ochlik, a French photojournalist who received several prestigious awards, including the first prize in the general news category at the World Press Photo Awards 2012 for his work in Libya. He was killed on February 22, 2012, during the bombardment of a media center in Homs, Syria. Veteran American journalist Marie Colvin was killed in the same attack. This exhibition presents 55 photographs captured by Ochlik during the Arab Spring.

About Rémi Ochlik

Rémi Ochlik was only 28 years old when he died, cutting short an impressive career as a photojournalist specializing in the coverage of global conflicts.

Born in eastern France in 1983, he studied photography at Icart Photo School and worked for Wostok, a photography agency. In 2004, at the age of 20, he went to Haiti to photograph riots surrounding the ouster of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. It was Ochlik's first conflict experience. The resulting work was distinguished by the Francois Chalais Award for Young Reporters and was projected at the Visa pour l’Image International Photojournalism Festival. In 2005 he founded his own photography agency IP3 PRESS, with the goal of covering news in Paris and conflicts around the world.

He covered the war in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 2008, the cholera epidemic and the 2010 presidential elections in Haiti. In 2011, Ochlik covered the “Arab Spring,” photographing the Tunisian and Egyptian revolutions as well as the uprising and war in Libya. His work was published in Le Monde Magazine, VSD, Paris Match, Time Magazine and The Wall Street Journal.

About the exhibition

Rémi Ochlik arrived in Tunisia on January 13, 2011, one day before President Ben Ali fled the country. He went to Sidi Bouzidto visit the grave of Mohamed Bouazizi. Educated but unemployed, Bouazizi was trying to feed his family by selling fruits and vegetables when the police confiscated his produce cart. In an act of desperation and anger, he doused him­self with paint thinner and set himself on fire on December 17. This act triggered the unfolding political crisis in Tunisia that would set the whole Arab world on fire.

In February, Ochlik ventured into Tahrir Square, the epicenter of protests against the Egyptian government. At the Tunisian-Libyan border, Ochlik documented the waves of refugees, mostly migrant workers from Egypt and Bangladesh.

In March, Ochlik entered Libya where he worked for months documenting the fall of Tripoli and the death of Qaddafi.

On February 21, 2012, Ochlik reached Syria: “I just arrived in Homs. It’s night­time but the situation seems incredibly tense and desperate. I’ll start making pictures tomorrow.”

He never did.

This exhibition is made possible thanks to the generous support of 

 

and is brought in collaboration with 

           

 

Special thanks to the Press and Communication Office of the French Embassy in Washington, D.C. 

For more information and reservations, please click here

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