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Oct 31
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Albertine Halloween Event Albertine Bookstore, 972 5th Ave New York, NY 10075
Oct 31
Kids
Albertine Halloween Event Albertine Bookstore, 972 5th Ave New York, NY 10075

Liberating History: Arab Feminisms and Mediated Pasts

Join the Block Cinema at Northwestern University for their free online screening series "Liberating History: Arab Feminisms and Mediated Pasts ".

Liberating History: Arab Feminisms and Mediated Pasts celebrates Arab women filmmakers. The films draw on archival material, Islamic visual culture, and ethnographic practice to bring a decolonial and feminist perspective to personal and national pasts. The series includes path-breaking films such as Heiny Srour’s LEILA AND THE WOLVES, which centers Arab women’s struggles in the region’s modern history, and Selma Baccar’s FATMA 75, an essay film combining history and fantasy, as well as other rare and recent selections from the Middle East and North Africa. The series will also feature two nights of short films curated by the Habibi Collective.
Co-presented by The Block Museum of Art with support from the Middle East and North African Studies Program at Northwestern University and Cultural Services of the French Embassy


LEILA AND THE WOLVES
(Heiny Srour, 1984, Lebanon/UK, digital, 93 min)
October 8-9 | 7 PM
Still from LEILA AND THE WOLVES courtesy of Cinenova
LEILA AND THE WOLVES brings together elements of documentary and evocations of Arabian mythology. Srour conducted often-dangerous location shooting for several years, combining wondrous compositions with images from archival film to reconstruct conventional historical narratives. Focusing on women’s neglected political and social contributions, LEILA AND THE WOLVES brings a sharp feminist perspective to the region’s conflicted colonial past.
Online screening followed by a pre-recorded discussion between filmmaker Heiny Srour and Dr. Rebecca C. Johnson.

THE THREE DISAPPEARANCES OF SOAD HOSNI
(Rania Stephan, 2011, Lebanon, digital, 68 min)
October 15-16 | 7 PM

This film by Lebanese video artist Rania Stephan explores the life of famed Egyptian movie star Soad Hosni. Stephan relies entirely on images and sound from rare videotapes of Hosni’s films, produced between 1959 and 1991--once wildly popular, now mostly inaccessible–-to tell the story of her life. Hosni died in London in 2001 (by suicide, though conspiracies abound), and despite her fame, true details of her life are scarce and contested. The film explores Hosni as a sex symbol, song-and-dance queen, and tragic heroine, emphasizing changing and contradictory views on gender and sexuality in Egypt and mourning the lost mediums and modes of Egyptian cinema.
Online screening followed by a pre-recorded discussion between filmmaker Rania Stephan and Dr. Hannah Feldman.

FATMA 75
(Selma Baccar, 1975, Tunisia, digital, 60 min)
October 22-23 | 7 PM

Still of FATMA 75 courtesy of Africa in Motion
Banned in its country of origin until recently, Fatma 75 is the first non-fiction film made by a Tunisian woman. It is a feminist essay film that uses the figure of a young woman, a university student, to embody and expand on the political histories of significant women in Maghrebi history. The protagonist is called Fatma as an ironic reference to the name French colonizers used to refer to Arab women. Director Selma Baccar combines fiction and re-enactment with interviews and archival material to vividly illustrate the intersecting histories of Tunisian independence and women’s emancipation. Shown in a new digital restoration produced by Africa in Motion.
Online screening followed by a live discussion between Professor Florence Martin, scholar of Maghrebi women's cinema, and NU candidate in the Department of Political Science Issrar Chamekh.

PRESENT FUTURES: SCI-FI AND SOCIAL ECOLOGY
(Various Artists, 2009-2019, Various Countries, digital, approx. 82 min)
October 29-30 | 7 PM
Still from IN VITRO courtesy of the artist
"Present Futures" is the first of two shorts programs guest-curated by the Habibi Collective, a digital archive and curatorial platform based in London, focused on femxle filmmaking from the Middle East and North Africa. This screening features short films by women that imagine futures and forms of resilience in a time of climate violence. The films include Palestinian artist Larissa Sansour’s IN VITRO, a post-apocalyptic sci-fi short about loss and revival. Each film explores how the climate crisis intersects with ongoing questions of inheritance and resistance in the Arab world.

INHERITED MEMORY: BLOOD RUNS THICKER THAN WATER
(Various Artists, 2009-2019, Various Countries, digital, approx. 78 min)
October 30-31 | 7 PM
"Inherited Memory" is the second of two shorts programs guest-curated by the Habibi Collective, a digital archive and curatorial platform based in London, focused on femxle filmmaking from the Middle East and North Africa. The screening features four short films that address themes of inheritance and generational memory in Lebanon, Syria, Tunisia, and their diaspora. The films include Lamia Joreige’s essay film A JOURNEY, which brings together various archival media to situate personal history within a political conflict, as well as other short fiction and documentaries about family conflict, solidarity, and legacies.
Followed by a discussion between Róisín Tapponi, founder and curator of the Habibi Collective in the U.K., and “Liberating History” series co-curators Simran Bhalla and Malia Haines-Stewart.

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