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Film Series
New French Shorts Nationwide US Theaters and Virtual Cinemas

The Films of Alice Guy-Blaché and Others

The Films of Alice Guy-Blaché,” 60 min. Getting her start shortly before the turn of the century, French-born Alice Guy-Blaché is perhaps the first female director, and a pioneer of narrative films in an era when the then-new medium was primarily used to document events. 

Films include:

Color-Tinted 2K Restoration! “Algie the Miner” (1912, 10 min.) A Western with an LGBT subtext, this comedy short stars Billy Quirk as a city slicker who turns cowboy to prove his manliness. Music by Liz Magnes. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.
2K Restoration! “A Fool and His Money” (1912, 11 min.) The first film with all-black cast stars William Russell as a laborer who hopes some cash will impress his sweetheart. Music by Carolyn Swartz. Courtesy of the Library of Congress and the David Navone Collection. Preserved by New York Women in Film & Television’s Women’s Film Preservation Fund.
Color-Tinted 2K Restoration! “The Ocean Waif” (1916, 36 min.) A novelist looking for a secluded place to write finds a house where an abused young woman is hiding. Music by Maud Nelissen. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Plus Archival Rarities:
Fieldwork Footage by Zora Neale Hurston (1929, 12 min.)
“The Curse of Quon Gwon: When the Far East Mingles with the West” (1916, 35 min. Dir. Marion E. Wong) The first film by an Asian-American woman, this love story was the sole production from Wong’s Mandarin Film Company
"Motherhood: Life's Greates Miracle", 1925, 60 min. Dir. Lita Lawrence. Perhaps the earliest surviving feature directed by an African-American woman

Part of the American Cinematheque's series Pioneers: First Women Filmmakers.  
In the 1910s and early ’20s, woman directors were not uncommon. Some worked for the major studios. Some established their own companies. They were hugely influential in shaping the language of cinema, as the industry moved from short films to features. From comedies, thrillers, dramas and even Westerns, their films are visually dazzling, emotionally complex and defiantly controversial. Showcasing these ambitious works from the golden age of women directors also underlines what was lost by the marginalization of women to “support roles" within the film industry.

Co-presented by Kino Lorber and the Library of Congress

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