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Mar 8
Talk
About Djaïli Amadou Amal and Fabienne Kanor ONLINE @ University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa @Georgia State University in Atlanta, @University of Iowa @Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the United States - Atlanta Office.
Mar 8
Talk
About Djaïli Amadou Amal and Fabienne Kanor ONLINE @ University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa @Georgia State University in Atlanta, @University of Iowa @Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the United States - Atlanta Office.

New African films from California Newsreel Available on OVID

Karmen Gei

OVID announced a new partnership with California Newsreel, a leading distributor of documentary and feature films with a focus on social justice, African American history and a large collection of work on African politics and culture by African directors.

Ainsi Meurent Les Anges (And So Angels Die)
A film by Moussa Sene Absa, 2001, Senegal

Ainsi meurent les anges shows how a "dream deferred" can become a nightmare, how a stolen past can make the present impossible and render modernity untenable, how history can become paralyzed. It is a film about the loss of innocence - by an individual and by an entire generation. These lost possibilities, these foregone selves, irrecoverable yet unforgettable, are the angels of the title.

Ezra
A film by Newton Aduaka, 2007, Nigeria/France/Austria
Ezra is the first film to give an African perspective on the disturbing phenomenon of abducting child soldiers into the continent’s recent civil wars. It was awarded the Grand Prize at the 2007 Festival Panafricain du Cinema à Ouagadougou (FESPACO), Africa’s largest and most prestigious film event, and was selected for the International Critics Week at the 2007 Cannes Film Festival. Ezra stands out among other African films as a complex psychological study and a plea for reconciliation..

Karmen Gei
A film by Joseph Gai Ramaka, 2001, Senegal/France/Canada
Karmen Geï is the first African Carmen, and, arguably, the first African filmed "musical." Accordingly, Gaï Ramaka has completely replaced Bizet's score and the usual staging with indigenous Senegalese music and choreography: Doudou N'Diaye Rose's sabar drummers, Julien Jouga's choir, El Hadj Ndiaye's songs and Yandé Coudou Sène's prophetic voice. Saxophonist David Murray's contemporary jazz score runs like a thread of unfulfilled desire through the film.

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